Dutch news in brief – 1 July 2004

1st July 2004, Comments 0 comments

Euro forgery 'on the slide' , The number of false euros circulating in the Netherlands has doubled in the past six months. Provisional figures compiled by the Dutch Central Bank (DNB) show 18,000 forged notes have been detected since January, compared with 9,000 in the same period last year. Nevertheless, the DNB believes a corner has been turned and that the number of forged notes in circulation is set to decline. The optimism is partly based on figures showing that the number of false notes rocketed to 1

Euro forgery 'on the slide'

The number of false euros circulating in the Netherlands has doubled in the past six months. Provisional figures compiled by the Dutch Central Bank (DNB) show 18,000 forged notes have been detected since January, compared with 9,000 in the same period last year. Nevertheless, the DNB believes a corner has been turned and that the number of forged notes in circulation is set to decline. The optimism is partly based on figures showing that the number of false notes rocketed to 17,000 in the second half of 2003, but the tempo has slowed since then. Separately on Thursday, the organisation that regulates payment in the Netherlands, MOB, said shopkeepers may begin rounding off cash prices and payments to the nearest 5 cents from 1 September. This could potentially signal the demise of the much-criticised 1 cent coin.

Grenade found under football field

Small football club SV Urk has for years had explosive potential, but the players knew nothing about it. No one did, until workers laying new grass on the pitch unearthed a live grenade. A bomb disposal team took the device to a nearby field and carried out a controlled explosion. It is unclear how long the grenade, which pre-dates the Second World War, has lain in the soil under the pitch. The area around Urk was still under the Zuiderzee before the war. The area was reclaimed from the sea with the creation of the IJsselmeer. It is speculated the explosive was transported in soil transported to the Club grounds years ago.

Police to monitor right-wing teen gangs

The police department in Venlo said Thursday it will increase monitoring of an estimated 110 far-right teenagers, aged 14 to 18, who have been accused of menacing the area. The announcement coincided with the publications of research into extreme right-wing activities in the locality. The young men usually wear Lonsdale-branded clothes and are suspected of public order offences, intimidation, vandalism, arson, assault and selling drugs, news website nu.nl reported.

Welfare cuts for car owners

The Social Services department in Groningen has reduced welfare payments to about 100 people because they own three or more cars. Benefit payments to some social security clients were withdrawn completely, news agency ANP reported on Thursday.

Arrests at CO2 protest

Environmental group Greenpeace held a protest at a coal-fired power station in Maasvlakte in Rotterdam Thursday as part of its campaign against greenhouse gas emissions. Police arrested 14 activists who climbed a chimney to paint "Stop CO2" in large letters on the structure. Greenpeace is worried that liberalisation of the energy market in the Netherlands on 1 July will lead to higher prices for green energy. The liberalisation of the market gives consumers the ability to choose their energy supplier, hopefully leading to lower prices due to competition, but research has shown that at present there is very little difference in the prices charged by the various companies.

[Copyright Expatica News 2004]

Subject: Dutch news in brief

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