Dutch lay down conditions for Taylor case

30th March 2006, Comments 0 comments

30 March 2006, AMSTERDAM — The Netherlands signalled on Thursday it was prepared to host the trial of former Liberian President Charles Taylor.

30 March 2006

AMSTERDAM — The Netherlands signalled on Thursday it was prepared to host the trial of former Liberian President Charles Taylor.

The UN-backed Special Tribunal for Sierra Leone made the request to move the trial to The Hague shortly after Taylor was captured while trying to flee Nigeria on Wednesday. A spokesperson for the Dutch Foreign Ministry said the Sierra Leone-based court feared Taylor's presence in the country could create instability or threaten peace.

The Dutch authorities set three conditions for the trial to be moved to The Hague. The spokesperson said the UN Security Council would have to pass a resolution backing the change of venue and Taylor would have to leave the Netherlands once the court delivered its verdict.

In addition, the Dutch want the International Criminal Court in The Hague to make arrangements for the provision of a court room and a cell to hold Taylor in during his stay in the Netherlands.

The US first suggested on Wednesday Taylor be tried in the Netherlands rather than Freetown in Sierra Leone due to security concerns. This does not represent a warming in Washington to the International Criminal Court.

American UN Ambassador John Bolton said Taylor had to be dealt with by the Sierra Leone-based tribunal "but the jurisdiction of the court is not connected to a specific location".  

Taylor faces charges for war crimes and crimes against humanity committed during the conflict in Sierra Leone.

[Copyright Expatica News + ANP 2006]

Subject: Dutch news

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