"Dutch anti-terror approach is unique"

28th June 2007, Comments 0 comments

28 June 2007, AMSTERDAM - "The Netherlands has taken a unique approach in fighting home grown terrorism." This was the message that deputy national coordinator for anti-terrorism Lidewijde Ongering conveyed during a hearing before the US senate homeland security commission. This commission, led by senator Joe Lieberman, has started an inquiry into radicalisation among Muslims in the US. As part of this inquiry the commission wants to learn from the experience of other countries in combating terrorism that

28 June 2007

AMSTERDAM - "The Netherlands has taken a unique approach in fighting home grown terrorism." This was the message that deputy national coordinator for anti-terrorism Lidewijde Ongering conveyed during a hearing before the US senate homeland security commission.
 
This commission, led by senator Joe Lieberman, has started an inquiry into radicalisation among Muslims in the US. As part of this inquiry the commission wants to learn from the experience of other countries in combating terrorism that is "home grown".  

Ongering says the Dutch approach is unique because it does not concentrate purely on combating terrorism, but devotes equal attention to prevention.

The aim of this approach is to intervene at an early stage and prevent people from becoming receptive to radical ideas and getting caught up in these movements.

"No one is born a terrorist. People who are out to kill other people for political or religious reasons first go through a process of radicalisation.

We are convinced that there are many opportunities to intervene in this early phase," Ongering told the commission. The point is not only to track down and arrest dangerous individuals but also to prevent radicalisation in the first place.

Ongering also said it is important to train imams in the Netherlands. The advantage these imams have over imported imams is that they know the conditions in the Netherlands, and can help young people find answers in the Dutch context.

Young Muslims in the West often have problems with identity because they are not accepted by society.

"In seeking their identity many turn to the internet. If they type "Islam" into Google they quickly end up on radical Islamic websites. That is why we have started to put a brake on these radical Islamic voices, at least on Dutch language websites," Ongerling said.

[Copyright Expatica News + ANP 2007]

Subject: Dutch news

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