Better CAO for civil service

12th April 2007, Comments 0 comments

12 April 2007, AMSTERDAM – After three months of strikes and demonstrations there has been a breakthrough in the deadlocked negotiations on a collective labour agreement for the civil service. Informal talks between the unions and the home affairs ministry have resulted in a proposal which will give civil servants a 10.5-perent pay rise over the coming three years and three months, the Volkskrant reports.

12 April 2007

AMSTERDAM – After three months of strikes and demonstrations there has been a breakthrough in the deadlocked negotiations on a collective labour agreement for the civil service. Informal talks between the unions and the home affairs ministry have resulted in a proposal which will give civil servants a 10.5-perent pay rise over the coming three years and three months, the Volkskrant reports.

The proposal includes a 6.5-percent salary increase, plus an increase to the end-of-year bonus, which currently comes to 1.6 percent, but which in the coming years will increase to a full 13th month, 8.3 percent. The civil servants will also be given EUR 1,200 a year as compensation for the increase in health insurance.

The increase of 10.5 percent in just over 3 years is equal to an annual increase of 3.2 percent. That is more than trade union confederations FNV and CNV were asking for this year – they were aiming for an increase of 2.5 to 3 percent.

Jan-Willem Dieten, negotiator for the union of government workers affiliated with FNV, attributes the result to the demonstrations by civil servants over the past three months. Strikes were staged by customs officials at Schiphol, workers at the tax authority refrained from answering the phone for several days, and 13,000 officials came to The Hague to demonstrate in February.

Remkes, the former home affairs minister, was not willing to agree to a pay rise of more than 2 percent during the negotiations. He thought that the salaries of the civil service were already comparable to those in the private sector.

[Copyright Expatica News 2007]

Subject: Dutch news

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