Alarm over transport of dangerous substances

16th September 2004, Comments 0 comments

16 September 2004 , AMSTERDAM — A Council of Transport Safety investigation prompted by the leak of acrylonitrile at Amersfoort in 2002 has found that the supervision of transports of dangerous substances in the Netherlands is inadequate.

16 September 2004

AMSTERDAM — A Council of Transport Safety investigation prompted by the leak of acrylonitrile at Amersfoort in 2002 has found that the supervision of transports of dangerous substances in the Netherlands is inadequate.

Due to a faulty valve, some 600lr of the flammable and toxic acrylonitrile — also known as vinyl cyanide — leaked out of a goods train that was parked near Amersfoort station in August 2002. No one was injured in the incident.

But a resulting investigation into the regulations of rail transport found that "fundamental gaps" exist in Dutch legislation and only "marginal" inspections are carried out.

"The results of the investigation have amazed the council, it not alarmed it," council chairman Pieter van Vollenhoven said.

The council urged the industry and the Dutch government to take immediate measures. It said the chemical industry and transport companies must assume responsibility and implement better supervision to ensure regulations are being complied with.

The Transport Ministry was advised to make international safety agreements in regards the transport of dangerous substance by rail, news agency ANP reported.

In contrast to trucks which transport dangerous substances, there are no rules governing the parking or security of trains loaded with flammable, poisonous or explosive materials.

[Copyright Expatica News 2004]

Subject: Dutch news

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