AIVD sets up posts in Islamic countries

14th January 2005, Comments 0 comments

14 January 2005, AMSTERDAM — The Dutch security service AIVD is to set up liaison offices in Muslim countries that play an important role in international terrorism.

14 January 2005

AMSTERDAM — The Dutch security service AIVD is to set up liaison offices in Muslim countries that play an important role in international terrorism.

The offices will be based in the local Dutch embassy and AIVD staff will liaise with their local counterparts to gather and exchange Intelligence, the AIVD has confirmed.

An AIVD spokesperson told newspaper De Telegraaf on Friday the posts would be set up in Saudi Arabia, Morocco and Pakistan.

Denying this was a new policy, the spokesperson said there have long been contacts between the AIVD and security services in those countries. But until now, the contacts were handled by other international outposts.

"We have, for instance, been based for a long time in Jordan and Singapore and a number of other countries, which also have been involved in the battle against international terrorism," the spokesperson said.

The AIVD maintains that some people in Saudi Arabia, Morocco and Pakistan play an important role in international terrorism. It would be strange therefore, the organisation said, if the AIVD did not have contacts with the security services in those countries.

"It goes without saying that we will exercise great caution in the way we maintain the contact and exchange information, because, in another context, these countries operate another type of society," the spokesperson said.

The AIVD emphasised it will not jettison its democratic principles while co-operating with the security services in less or totally undemocratic countries —  places where there are frequent incidents of human rights abuses.

The Dutch government decided to give the AIVD an additional EUR 100 million to hire more spies following the murder of filmmaker and Muslim critic Theo van Gogh last November.

And a security alert sparked by the arrest of a then 17-year-old Dutch-Moroccan boy in July 2004 has yet to be officially rescinded. Samir A. faces prosecution on charges of plotting attacks on the Dutch parliament, Schiphol Airport and other key installations.

[Copyright Expatica News 2005]

Subject: Dutch news

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