Expat Voices: Maria Raluca Popa on living in the Netherlands

Expat Voices: Maria Raluca Popa on living in the Netherlands

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Romanian mum and dance therapist Maria Raluca Popa knows that expat women having their first baby in the Netherlands often feel confused and isolated.

Name: Maria Raluca Popa
Nationality: Romanian
City of residence: Rotterdam
Date of birth: 02 Dec 1974
Civil status: samenwonen with our child of one and a half years
Occupation: dance movement therapist
Reason for moving to the Netherlands: partner
Lived in the Netherlands for 6 years

What was your first impression of the Netherlands?

When I first came I was living in Delft, which is a nice place to start learning about the Dutch culture. I loved the city and the international student life. I felt quickly at home.

What do you think of the food?


I hear foreigners complaining a lot about the food. I used to complain also. The truth is that there is a plurality of food cultures in The Netherlands. There is so much more to choose from besides the traditional (boring) Dutch broodje kaas.

What do you think of the shopping in the Netherlands?

Much less variety than in other European countries, especially in food supermarkets, but also clothing, baby items, etc.


What do you appreciate about living in the Netherlands?
The cycling-friendly culture and infrastructure!! It has made my life so much better. Cycling is simple, healthy, cheap, eco-friendly and the most efficient mode of transportation in the Dutch cities.

http://www.sxc.hu/photo
Erasmus bridge Rotterdam


What do you find most frustrating about living in the Netherlands?

I used to say the weather, but now after six years of living here I got used to it. At this point what bothers me the most is the fact that you have to be an insider to have access to a lot of governmental help, facilities, grants, support, even information. In the health system, one has to scream very hard in order to be heard and treated.

What puzzles you about the Netherlands and what do you miss since you’ve moved here?


The polder model in organizations and public life: letting everyone express their opinion is taken to an absurd level, which it impairs efficiency. The rather segregated life of different cultural and ethnic groups.

I miss being close to my extended family. I come originally from a big family with a network of cousins, aunts, uncles, etc. Since I had my baby I miss it particularly.

http://www.sxc.hu/photo

 Kralingse plas, Rotterdam in the winter



How does the quality of life in the Netherlands compare to the quality of life in other countries that you’ve lived in?


It is difficult to compare because I was at different stages of my life living in different countries (Romania, Hungary, Great Britain and the Netherlands). Coming to The Netherlands coincided with me not being a student anymore and having to adapt to an ‘adult’ lifestyle. It has been a difficult transition but I guess it would have been in the other countries that I lived in too.

trong> Rotterdam
Date of birth: 02 Dec 1974
Civil status: samenwonen with our child of one and a half years
Occupation: dance movement therapist
Reason for moving to the Netherlands: partner
Lived in the Netherlands for 6 years

What was your first impression of the Netherlands?

When I first came I was living in Delft, which is a nice place to start learning about the Dutch culture. I loved the city and the international student life. I felt quickly at home.

What do you think of the food?


I hear foreigners complaining a lot about the food. I used to complain also. The truth is that there is a plurality of food cultures in The Netherlands. There is so much more to choose from besides the traditional (boring) Dutch broodje kaas.

What do you think of the shopping in the Netherlands?

Much less variety than in other European countries, especially in food supermarkets, but also clothing, baby items, etc.


What do you appreciate about living in the Netherlands?
The cycling-friendly culture and infrastructure!! It has made my life so much better. Cycling is simple, healthy, cheap, eco-friendly and the most efficient mode of transportation in the Dutch cities.

http://www.sxc.hu/photo
Erasmus bridge Rotterdam


What do you find most frustrating about living in the Netherlands?

I used to say the weather, but now after six years of living here I got used to it. At this point what bothers me the most is the fact that you have to be an insider to have access to a lot of governmental help, facilities, grants, support, even information. In the health system, one has to scream very hard in order to be heard and treated.

What puzzles you about the Netherlands and what do you miss since you’ve moved here?


The polder model in organizations and public life: letting everyone express their opinion is taken to an absurd level, which it impairs efficiency. The rather segregated life of different cultural and ethnic groups.

I miss being close to my extended family. I come originally from a big family with a network of cousins, aunts, uncles, etc. Since I had my baby I miss it particularly.

http://www.sxc.hu/photo

 Kralingse plas, Rotterdam in the winter



How does the quality of life in the Netherlands compare to the quality of life in other countries that you’ve lived in?


It is difficult to compare because I was at different stages of my life living in different countries (Romania, Hungary, Great Britain and the Netherlands). Coming to The Netherlands coincided with me not being a student anymore and having to adapt to an ‘adult’ lifestyle. It has been a difficult transition but I guess it would have been in the other countries that I lived in too.

tain and the Netherlands). Coming to The Netherlands coincided with me not being a student anymore and having to adapt to an ‘adult’ lifestyle. It has been a difficult transition but I guess it would have been in the other countries that I lived in too.

trong> Rotterdam
Date of birth: 02 Dec 1974
Civil status: samenwonen with our child of one and a half years
Occupation: dance movement therapist
Reason for moving to the Netherlands: partner
Lived in the Netherlands for 6 years

What was your first impression of the Netherlands?

When I first came I was living in Delft, which is a nice place to start learning about the Dutch culture. I loved the city and the international student life. I felt quickly at home.

What do you think of the food?


I hear foreigners complaining a lot about the food. I used to complain also. The truth is that there is a plurality of food cultures in The Netherlands. There is so much more to choose from besides the traditional (boring) Dutch broodje kaas.

What do you think of the shopping in the Netherlands?

Much less variety than in other European countries, especially in food supermarkets, but also clothing, baby items, etc.


What do you appreciate about living in the Netherlands?
The cycling-friendly culture and infrastructure!! It has made my life so much better. Cycling is simple, healthy, cheap, eco-friendly and the most efficient mode of transportation in the Dutch cities.

http://www.sxc.hu/photo
Erasmus bridge Rotterdam


What do you find most frustrating about living in the Netherlands?

I used to say the weather, but now after six years of living here I got used to it. At this point what bothers me the most is the fact that you have to be an insider to have access to a lot of governmental help, facilities, grants, support, even information. In the health system, one has to scream very hard in order to be heard and treated.

What puzzles you about the Netherlands and what do you miss since you’ve moved here?


The polder model in organizations and public life: letting everyone express their opinion is taken to an absurd level, which it impairs efficiency. The rather segregated life of different cultural and ethnic groups.

I miss being close to my extended family. I come originally from a big family with a network of cousins, aunts, uncles, etc. Since I had my baby I miss it particularly.

http://www.sxc.hu/photo

 Kralingse plas, Rotterdam in the winter



How does the quality of life in the Netherlands compare to the quality of life in other countries that you’ve lived in?


It is difficult to compare because I was at different stages of my life living in different countries (Romania, Hungary, Great Britain and the Netherlands). Coming to The Netherlands coincided with me not being a student anymore and having to adapt to an ‘adult’ lifestyle. It has been a difficult transition but I guess it would have been in the other countries that I lived in too.

>

When I first came I was living in Delft, which is a nice place to start learning about the Dutch culture. I loved the city and the international student life. I felt quickly at home.

What do you think of the food?


I hear foreigners complaining a lot about the food. I used to complain also. The truth is that there is a plurality of food cultures in The Netherlands. There is so much more to choose from besides the traditional (boring) Dutch broodje kaas.

What do you think of the shopping in the Netherlands?

Much less variety than in other European countries, especially in food supermarkets, but also clothing, baby items, etc.


What do you appreciate about living in the Netherlands?
The cycling-friendly culture and infrastructure!! It has made my life so much better. Cycling is simple, healthy, cheap, eco-friendly and the most efficient mode of transportation in the Dutch cities.

http://www.sxc.hu/photo
Erasmus bridge Rotterdam


What do you find most frustrating about living in the Netherlands?

I used to say the weather, but now after six years of living here I got used to it. At this point what bothers me the most is the fact that you have to be an insider to have access to a lot of governmental help, facilities, grants, support, even information. In the health system, one has to scream very hard in order to be heard and treated.

What puzzles you about the Netherlands and what do you miss since you’ve moved here?


The polder model in organizations and public life: letting everyone express their opinion is taken to an absurd level, which it impairs efficiency. The rather segregated life of different cultural and ethnic groups.

I miss being close to my extended family. I come originally from a big family with a network of cousins, aunts, uncles, etc. Since I had my baby I miss it particularly.

http://www.sxc.hu/photo

 Kralingse plas, Rotterdam in the winter



How does the quality of life in the Netherlands compare to the quality of life in other countries that you’ve lived in?


It is difficult to compare because I was at different stages of my life living in different countries (Romania, Hungary, Great Britain and the Netherlands). Coming to The Netherlands coincided with me not being a student anymore and having to adapt to an ‘adult’ lifestyle. It has been a difficult transition but I guess it would have been in the other countries that I lived in too.

trong> Rotterdam
Date of birth: 02 Dec 1974
Civil status: samenwonen with our child of one and a half years
Occupation: dance movement therapist
Reason for moving to the Netherlands: partner
Lived in the Netherlands for 6 years

What was your first impression of the Netherlands?

When I first came I was living in Delft, which is a nice place to start learning about the Dutch culture. I loved the city and the international student life. I felt quickly at home.

What do you think of the food?


I hear foreigners complaining a lot about the food. I used to complain also. The truth is that there is a plurality of food cultures in The Netherlands. There is so much more to choose from besides the traditional (boring) Dutch broodje kaas.

What do you think of the shopping in the Netherlands?

Much less variety than in other European countries, especially in food supermarkets, but also clothing, baby items, etc.


What do you appreciate about living in the Netherlands?
The cycling-friendly culture and infrastructure!! It has made my life so much better. Cycling is simple, healthy, cheap, eco-friendly and the most efficient mode of transportation in the Dutch cities.

http://www.sxc.hu/photo
Erasmus bridge Rotterdam


What do you find most frustrating about living in the Netherlands?

I used to say the weather, but now after six years of living here I got used to it. At this point what bothers me the most is the fact that you have to be an insider to have access to a lot of governmental help, facilities, grants, support, even information. In the health system, one has to scream very hard in order to be heard and treated.

What puzzles you about the Netherlands and what do you miss since you’ve moved here?


The polder model in organizations and public life: letting everyone express their opinion is taken to an absurd level, which it impairs efficiency. The rather segregated life of different cultural and ethnic groups.

I miss being close to my extended family. I come originally from a big family with a network of cousins, aunts, uncles, etc. Since I had my baby I miss it particularly.

http://www.sxc.hu/photo

 Kralingse plas, Rotterdam in the winter



How does the quality of life in the Netherlands compare to the quality of life in other countries that you’ve lived in?


It is difficult to compare because I was at different stages of my life living in different countries (Romania, Hungary, Great Britain and the Netherlands). Coming to The Netherlands coincided with me not being a student anymore and having to adapt to an ‘adult’ lifestyle. It has been a difficult transition but I guess it would have been in the other countries that I lived in too.

tain and the Netherlands). Coming to The Netherlands coincided with me not being a student anymore and having to adapt to an ‘adult’ lifestyle. It has been a difficult transition but I guess it would have been in the other countries that I lived in too.

trong> Rotterdam
Date of birth: 02 Dec 1974
Civil status: samenwonen with our child of one and a half years
Occupation: dance movement therapist
Reason for moving to the Netherlands: partner
Lived in the Netherlands for 6 years

What was your first impression of the Netherlands?

When I first came I was living in Delft, which is a nice place to start learning about the Dutch culture. I loved the city and the international student life. I felt quickly at home.

What do you think of the food?


I hear foreigners complaining a lot about the food. I used to complain also. The truth is that there is a plurality of food cultures in The Netherlands. There is so much more to choose from besides the traditional (boring) Dutch broodje kaas.

What do you think of the shopping in the Netherlands?

Much less variety than in other European countries, especially in food supermarkets, but also clothing, baby items, etc.


What do you appreciate about living in the Netherlands?
The cycling-friendly culture and infrastructure!! It has made my life so much better. Cycling is simple, healthy, cheap, eco-friendly and the most efficient mode of transportation in the Dutch cities.

http://www.sxc.hu/photo
Erasmus bridge Rotterdam


What do you find most frustrating about living in the Netherlands?

I used to say the weather, but now after six years of living here I got used to it. At this point what bothers me the most is the fact that you have to be an insider to have access to a lot of governmental help, facilities, grants, support, even information. In the health system, one has to scream very hard in order to be heard and treated.

What puzzles you about the Netherlands and what do you miss since you’ve moved here?


The polder model in organizations and public life: letting everyone express their opinion is taken to an absurd level, which it impairs efficiency. The rather segregated life of different cultural and ethnic groups.

I miss being close to my extended family. I come originally from a big family with a network of cousins, aunts, uncles, etc. Since I had my baby I miss it particularly.

http://www.sxc.hu/photo

 Kralingse plas, Rotterdam in the winter



How does the quality of life in the Netherlands compare to the quality of life in other countries that you’ve lived in?


It is difficult to compare because I was at different stages of my life living in different countries (Romania, Hungary, Great Britain and the Netherlands). Coming to The Netherlands coincided with me not being a student anymore and having to adapt to an ‘adult’ lifestyle. It has been a difficult transition but I guess it would have been in the other countries that I lived in too.

Maria Raluca Popa
Nationality: Romanian
City of residence: Rotterdam
Date of birth: 02 Dec 1974
Civil status: samenwonen with our child of one and a half years
Occupation: dance movement therapist
Reason for moving to the Netherlands: partner
Lived in the Netherlands for 6 years

What was your first impression of the Netherlands?

When I first came I was living in Delft, which is a nice place to start learning about the Dutch culture. I loved the city and the international student life. I felt quickly at home.

What do you think of the food?


I hear foreigners complaining a lot about the food. I used to complain also. The truth is that there is a plurality of food cultures in The Netherlands. There is so much more to choose from besides the traditional (boring) Dutch broodje kaas.

What do you think of the shopping in the Netherlands?

Much less variety than in other European countries, especially in food supermarkets, but also clothing, baby items, etc.


What do you appreciate about living in the Netherlands?
The cycling-friendly culture and infrastructure!! It has made my life so much better. Cycling is simple, healthy, cheap, eco-friendly and the most efficient mode of transportation in the Dutch cities.

http://www.sxc.hu/photo
Erasmus bridge Rotterdam


What do you find most frustrating about living in the Netherlands?

I used to say the weather, but now after six years of living here I got used to it. At this point what bothers me the most is the fact that you have to be an insider to have access to a lot of governmental help, facilities, grants, support, even information. In the health system, one has to scream very hard in order to be heard and treated.

What puzzles you about the Netherlands and what do you miss since you’ve moved here?


The polder model in organizations and public life: letting everyone express their opinion is taken to an absurd level, which it impairs efficiency. The rather segregated life of different cultural and ethnic groups.

I miss being close to my extended family. I come originally from a big family with a network of cousins, aunts, uncles, etc. Since I had my baby I miss it particularly.

http://www.sxc.hu/photo

 Kralingse plas, Rotterdam in the winter



How does the quality of life in the Netherlands compare to the quality of life in other countries that you’ve lived in?


It is difficult to compare because I was at different stages of my life living in different countries (Romania, Hungary, Great Britain and the Netherlands). Coming to The Netherlands coincided with me not being a student anymore and having to adapt to an ‘adult’ lifestyle. It has been a difficult transition but I guess it would have been in the other countries that I lived in too.

trong> Rotterdam
Date of birth: 02 Dec 1974
Civil status: samenwonen with our child of one and a half years
Occupation: dance movement therapist
Reason for moving to the Netherlands: partner
Lived in the Netherlands for 6 years

What was your first impression of the Netherlands?

When I first came I was living in Delft, which is a nice place to start learning about the Dutch culture. I loved the city and the international student life. I felt quickly at home.

What do you think of the food?


I hear foreigners complaining a lot about the food. I used to complain also. The truth is that there is a plurality of food cultures in The Netherlands. There is so much more to choose from besides the traditional (boring) Dutch broodje kaas.

What do you think of the shopping in the Netherlands?

Much less variety than in other European countries, especially in food supermarkets, but also clothing, baby items, etc.


What do you appreciate about living in the Netherlands?
The cycling-friendly culture and infrastructure!! It has made my life so much better. Cycling is simple, healthy, cheap, eco-friendly and the most efficient mode of transportation in the Dutch cities.

http://www.sxc.hu/photo
Erasmus bridge Rotterdam


What do you find most frustrating about living in the Netherlands?

I used to say the weather, but now after six years of living here I got used to it. At this point what bothers me the most is the fact that you have to be an insider to have access to a lot of governmental help, facilities, grants, support, even information. In the health system, one has to scream very hard in order to be heard and treated.

What puzzles you about the Netherlands and what do you miss since you’ve moved here?


The polder model in organizations and public life: letting everyone express their opinion is taken to an absurd level, which it impairs efficiency. The rather segregated life of different cultural and ethnic groups.

I miss being close to my extended family. I come originally from a big family with a network of cousins, aunts, uncles, etc. Since I had my baby I miss it particularly.

http://www.sxc.hu/photo

 Kralingse plas, Rotterdam in the winter



How does the quality of life in the Netherlands compare to the quality of life in other countries that you’ve lived in?


It is difficult to compare because I was at different stages of my life living in different countries (Romania, Hungary, Great Britain and the Netherlands). Coming to The Netherlands coincided with me not being a student anymore and having to adapt to an ‘adult’ lifestyle. It has been a difficult transition but I guess it would have been in the other countries that I lived in too.

tain and the Netherlands). Coming to The Netherlands coincided with me not being a student anymore and having to adapt to an ‘adult’ lifestyle. It has been a difficult transition but I guess it would have been in the other countries that I lived in too.

trong> Rotterdam
Date of birth: 02 Dec 1974
Civil status: samenwonen with our child of one and a half years
Occupation: dance movement therapist
Reason for moving to the Netherlands: partner
Lived in the Netherlands for 6 years

What was your first impression of the Netherlands?

When I first came I was living in Delft, which is a nice place to start learning about the Dutch culture. I loved the city and the international student life. I felt quickly at home.

What do you think of the food?


I hear foreigners complaining a lot about the food. I used to complain also. The truth is that there is a plurality of food cultures in The Netherlands. There is so much more to choose from besides the traditional (boring) Dutch broodje kaas.

What do you think of the shopping in the Netherlands?

Much less variety than in other European countries, especially in food supermarkets, but also clothing, baby items, etc.


What do you appreciate about living in the Netherlands?
The cycling-friendly culture and infrastructure!! It has made my life so much better. Cycling is simple, healthy, cheap, eco-friendly and the most efficient mode of transportation in the Dutch cities.

http://www.sxc.hu/photo
Erasmus bridge Rotterdam


What do you find most frustrating about living in the Netherlands?

I used to say the weather, but now after six years of living here I got used to it. At this point what bothers me the most is the fact that you have to be an insider to have access to a lot of governmental help, facilities, grants, support, even information. In the health system, one has to scream very hard in order to be heard and treated.

What puzzles you about the Netherlands and what do you miss since you’ve moved here?


The polder model in organizations and public life: letting everyone express their opinion is taken to an absurd level, which it impairs efficiency. The rather segregated life of different cultural and ethnic groups.

I miss being close to my extended family. I come originally from a big family with a network of cousins, aunts, uncles, etc. Since I had my baby I miss it particularly.

http://www.sxc.hu/photo

 Kralingse plas, Rotterdam in the winter



How does the quality of life in the Netherlands compare to the quality of life in other countries that you’ve lived in?


It is difficult to compare because I was at different stages of my life living in different countries (Romania, Hungary, Great Britain and the Netherlands). Coming to The Netherlands coincided with me not being a student anymore and having to adapt to an ‘adult’ lifestyle. It has been a difficult transition but I guess it would have been in the other countries that I lived in too.

>

When I first came I was living in Delft, which is a nice place to start learning about the Dutch culture. I loved the city and the international student life. I felt quickly at home.

What do you think of the food?


I hear foreigners complaining a lot about the food. I used to complain also. The truth is that there is a plurality of food cultures in The Netherlands. There is so much more to choose from besides the traditional (boring) Dutch broodje kaas.

What do you think of the shopping in the Netherlands?

Much less variety than in other European countries, especially in food supermarkets, but also clothing, baby items, etc.


What do you appreciate about living in the Netherlands?
The cycling-friendly culture and infrastructure!! It has made my life so much better. Cycling is simple, healthy, cheap, eco-friendly and the most efficient mode of transportation in the Dutch cities.

http://www.sxc.hu/photo
Erasmus bridge Rotterdam


What do you find most frustrating about living in the Netherlands?

I used to say the weather, but now after six years of living here I got used to it. At this point what bothers me the most is the fact that you have to be an insider to have access to a lot of governmental help, facilities, grants, support, even information. In the health system, one has to scream very hard in order to be heard and treated.

What puzzles you about the Netherlands and what do you miss since you’ve moved here?


The polder model in organizations and public life: letting everyone express their opinion is taken to an absurd level, which it impairs efficiency. The rather segregated life of different cultural and ethnic groups.

I miss being close to my extended family. I come originally from a big family with a network of cousins, aunts, uncles, etc. Since I had my baby I miss it particularly.

http://www.sxc.hu/photo

 Kralingse plas, Rotterdam in the winter



How does the quality of life in the Netherlands compare to the quality of life in other countries that you’ve lived in?


It is difficult to compare because I was at different stages of my life living in different countries (Romania, Hungary, Great Britain and the Netherlands). Coming to The Netherlands coincided with me not being a student anymore and having to adapt to an ‘adult’ lifestyle. It has been a difficult transition but I guess it would have been in the other countries that I lived in too.

trong> Rotterdam
Date of birth: 02 Dec 1974
Civil status: samenwonen with our child of one and a half years
Occupation: dance movement therapist
Reason for moving to the Netherlands: partner
Lived in the Netherlands for 6 years

What was your first impression of the Netherlands?

When I first came I was living in Delft, which is a nice place to start learning about the Dutch culture. I loved the city and the international student life. I felt quickly at home.

What do you think of the food?


I hear foreigners complaining a lot about the food. I used to complain also. The truth is that there is a plurality of food cultures in The Netherlands. There is so much more to choose from besides the traditional (boring) Dutch broodje kaas.

What do you think of the shopping in the Netherlands?

Much less variety than in other European countries, especially in food supermarkets, but also clothing, baby items, etc.


What do you appreciate about living in the Netherlands?
The cycling-friendly culture and infrastructure!! It has made my life so much better. Cycling is simple, healthy, cheap, eco-friendly and the most efficient mode of transportation in the Dutch cities.

http://www.sxc.hu/photo
Erasmus bridge Rotterdam


What do you find most frustrating about living in the Netherlands?

I used to say the weather, but now after six years of living here I got used to it. At this point what bothers me the most is the fact that you have to be an insider to have access to a lot of governmental help, facilities, grants, support, even information. In the health system, one has to scream very hard in order to be heard and treated.

What puzzles you about the Netherlands and what do you miss since you’ve moved here?


The polder model in organizations and public life: letting everyone express their opinion is taken to an absurd level, which it impairs efficiency. The rather segregated life of different cultural and ethnic groups.

I miss being close to my extended family. I come originally from a big family with a network of cousins, aunts, uncles, etc. Since I had my baby I miss it particularly.

http://www.sxc.hu/photo

 Kralingse plas, Rotterdam in the winter



How does the quality of life in the Netherlands compare to the quality of life in other countries that you’ve lived in?


It is difficult to compare because I was at different stages of my life living in different countries (Romania, Hungary, Great Britain and the Netherlands). Coming to The Netherlands coincided with me not being a student anymore and having to adapt to an ‘adult’ lifestyle. It has been a difficult transition but I guess it would have been in the other countries that I lived in too.

tain and the Netherlands). Coming to The Netherlands coincided with me not being a student anymore and having to adapt to an ‘adult’ lifestyle. It has been a difficult transition but I guess it would have been in the other countries that I lived in too.

trong> Rotterdam
Date of birth: 02 Dec 1974
Civil status: samenwonen with our child of one and a half years
Occupation: dance movement therapist
Reason for moving to the Netherlands: partner
Lived in the Netherlands for 6 years

What was your first impression of the Netherlands?

When I first came I was living in Delft, which is a nice place to start learning about the Dutch culture. I loved the city and the international student life. I felt quickly at home.

What do you think of the food?


I hear foreigners complaining a lot about the food. I used to complain also. The truth is that there is a plurality of food cultures in The Netherlands. There is so much more to choose from besides the traditional (boring) Dutch broodje kaas.

What do you think of the shopping in the Netherlands?

Much less variety than in other European countries, especially in food supermarkets, but also clothing, baby items, etc.


What do you appreciate about living in the Netherlands?
The cycling-friendly culture and infrastructure!! It has made my life so much better. Cycling is simple, healthy, cheap, eco-friendly and the most efficient mode of transportation in the Dutch cities.

http://www.sxc.hu/photo
Erasmus bridge Rotterdam


What do you find most frustrating about living in the Netherlands?

I used to say the weather, but now after six years of living here I got used to it. At this point what bothers me the most is the fact that you have to be an insider to have access to a lot of governmental help, facilities, grants, support, even information. In the health system, one has to scream very hard in order to be heard and treated.

What puzzles you about the Netherlands and what do you miss since you’ve moved here?


The polder model in organizations and public life: letting everyone express their opinion is taken to an absurd level, which it impairs efficiency. The rather segregated life of different cultural and ethnic groups.

I miss being close to my extended family. I come originally from a big family with a network of cousins, aunts, uncles, etc. Since I had my baby I miss it particularly.

http://www.sxc.hu/photo

 Kralingse plas, Rotterdam in the winter



How does the quality of life in the Netherlands compare to the quality of life in other countries that you’ve lived in?


It is difficult to compare because I was at different stages of my life living in different countries (Romania, Hungary, Great Britain and the Netherlands). Coming to The Netherlands coincided with me not being a student anymore and having to adapt to an ‘adult’ lifestyle. It has been a difficult transition but I guess it would have been in the other countries that I lived in too.

 

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