Young guns parade cowgirls and colour in Paris

1st March 2005, Comments 0 comments

PARIS, Feb 28 (AFP) - Up-and-coming designers from across Europe took centre stage in Paris on Monday, unveiling their collections for autumn-winter 2005-06 to kick off ready-to-wear week in the French capital.

PARIS, Feb 28 (AFP) - Up-and-coming designers from across Europe took centre stage in Paris on Monday, unveiling their collections for autumn-winter 2005-06 to kick off ready-to-wear week in the French capital.

Ahead of Japanese designer Yohji Yamamoto's evening show, the first veteran presentation of the week, the industry's young guns from Belgium, Britain, France, Germany and Portugal tried to seduce the Paris fashion crowd.

Italy's flag was also waving after venerable French house Givenchy named 30-year-old Riccardo Tisci to be its new womenswear designer, ending a search process that lasted for months.

Tisci, who unveiled his second collection under his own name in Milan last week, will present his first effort for Givenchy during haute couture week in July.

Britain's Sharon Wauchob, a graduate of the Central Saint Martins School in London that has produced a crop of current star designers like John Galliano and Alexander McQueen, turned her women into intense black-clad rock stars.

The Northern Ireland native sent her models stomping down the catwalk to a thumping rock soundtrack in slim-leg trousers with plenty of zip accents, sheer tops that left nothing to the imagination and studded cropped leather jackets.

Wauchob twisted, tucked and turned bits of silk jersey into tops and dresses, with one skirt hem pulled up with a chain of beads around the neck.

Midnight blue and deep purple added a bit of warmth to the stark colour palette.

Belgium's Bruno Pieters offered the polar opposite - a delicate collection all in champagne, pale yellow and flesh tones inspired by Art Deco style and the works of Jean Cocteau.

Pieters worked on proportion and volume, pairing cropped spencers with low-slung skirts, or a stiff corset-like top with loose jodhpurs. Pouf skirts fell just above the knee. For evening, a ruffled dress fluttered to the floor.

Beyond the day's catwalk shows, some designers opted to unveil their collections in the showroom like Belgium's Jean-Paul Knott, who conjured up a luxurious wardrobe of basics for men and women "who love each other".

A silk poplin trench, cashmere coats, white silk sweaters, a sumptuous fox scarf, a black satin peignoir, suits for men and women - Knott said he wanted to create a limited number of pieces for a couple on the go.

A goatskin vest revealed Knott's penchant for sharp cuts and functionality - folded up, it could easily double as a soft pillow on a transatlantic flight.

British designer Adam Jones concocted a collection of studded leather skirts and intricate knit coats accented with fur that conjured up images of tough but ultra-feminine gun slinging babes from the wild, wild West.

A turquoise and chocolate brown knit coat, with ribbons and fur woven into the design, seemed perfect for wrapping up on cold prairie nights. Skirts with suede fringe or white eyelet trim added to the cowgirl look.

For the first time, Jones offered accessories like low-slung wide leather belts with metallic heart and star designs, or belts with colourful beaded flower motifs that recalled Native American art.

Portugal's Felipe Oliveira Baptista opted for a sportier look, combining couture technique with biker chic for what he called "functional ball gear -- something fun and very joyous".

Using primary colours and ever-stylish black, Baptista's collection cut a clean silhouette. Tiny zips in the sleeves gave a black taffeta cocktail gown a bit of an edge.

© AFP

Subject: French News

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