US mechanic 'faces arrest' over Concorde crash

29th June 2005, Comments 0 comments

PARIS, June 28 (AFP) - An arrest warrant may soon be issued for a Continental Airlines mechanic who failed to show up for questioning about a metal strip from one of his company's planes that allegedly brought down a Concorde near Paris in 2000, judicial sources in Paris said on Tuesday.

PARIS, June 28 (AFP) - An arrest warrant may soon be issued for a Continental Airlines mechanic who failed to show up for questioning about a metal strip from one of his company's planes that allegedly brought down a Concorde near Paris in 2000, judicial sources in Paris said on Tuesday.

John Taylor, who installed the titanium strip on a Continental plane that took off on the same runway as the doomed Concorde, failed to show up on June 17 as requested for questioning by a French judge investigating the crash that killed all 109 people on board as well as four more on the ground.

The fiery crash of the needle-nosed Air France jet created headlines around the world and contributed to the supersonic aviation icon being pulled from the skies in 2003.

Judicial sources said that if Taylor failed to present himself for questioning he could be issued with the arrest warrant on charges of manslaughter and causing injury.

Stanley Ford, a senior Continental mechanic who supervised the installation of the metal strip, was on June 16 questioned in Paris by the French judge.

Both Taylor and Ford are US citizens.

A French legal inquiry concluded in December that a titanium strip that fell from the Continental DC-10 sliced through the New York-bound Concorde's tyres, sending rubber chunks through a fuel tank and causing the jet to fall from the sky in a fireball.

The inquiry's report said the two Continental mechanics who installed the metal strip had not respected "the rules of aeronautical metal construction."

Continental itself was in March placed under investigation for manslaughter and injuries.

The US airline has categorically denied any responsibility for the crash and said it would fight any criminal charges stemming from the French probe of the accident.

The Concorde crashed as it was taking off from Charles de Gaulle airport on July 25, 2000.

Copyright AFP

Subject: French news

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