US green team cleans up Cannes cans

25th May 2007, Comments 0 comments

CANNES, France, May 25, 2007 (AFP) - While few environmentally-friendly films are up for sale on the Cannes filmfest market this year, the US entertainment industry turned over a new leaf, setting up a "Green Team" to work on waste.

CANNES, France, May 25, 2007 (AFP) - While few environmentally-friendly films are up for sale on the Cannes filmfest market this year, the US entertainment industry turned over a new leaf, setting up a "Green Team" to work on waste.

 For the 2007 edition of Cannes, the American Pavilion enlisted the help of 40 film students to collect and sort recyclable waste from the vast amount of rubbish thrown out during the 12-day fest by its 15,000 participants.

And the initiative predictably was all thanks to a film.

"Al Gore's Oscar-winning film, 'An Inconvenient Truth', said it would be willing to sponsor a green team when it premiered last year here in Cannes," pavilion spokeswoman Carol Marshall told AFP. "They're only baby steps but important ones."

That said, the American pavilion alone recycles 200 pounds (90 kilos) of paper, plastic and aluminium each day alone.

And for the first time the Cannes organisers have introduced recycling bins.

Leila Conners Petersen, who co-directed Leonardo DiCaprio's new eco-documentary "The 11th Hour" recently described Cannes as "an icon of waste and consumption.

"But it is also an icon of cinema, where the world's attention is focused. While it's upsetting to see all the waste here, Cannes also provides a unique opportunity to get the green message out."

But while green programmes are multiplying across the world of TV there were few signs of an environmental breakthrough in movies at the world's biggest film market, closing Saturday.

DiCaprio's "The 11th Hour" premiered at the May 16-27 filmfest but buyers seeking global warming subject matter among the thousands of films up for sale have had to dig hard.

One exception is "Crude Impact", an award winning docu-feature exploring the roots of world dependency on oil and the implications when the natural resource begins to decline.

"There's been a lot of interest at this Cannes in 'Crude Impact'," Los-Angeles-based producer and distributor TorchLight's senior sales exec J.D. Beaufils told AFP.

The multi-award winning docu-feature explores the roots of the world's dependency on oil and the implications of what will happen when this natural resources starts to decline.

A planned film about India's 1984 Bhopal tragedy has also attracted  attention. Young up-coming writer-director Ravi Kumar's "Bhopal" focuses on the world's worst industrial disaster in which as many as 222,000 people lost their lives.

In television, Robert Redford's new Sundance green channel is heading the TV eco drive and major broadcasters are readying prime-time eco programmes that range from documentaries to TV reality shows and lifestyle.

But as one industry expert quipped, at this Cannes the only green around in great quantity were the dollars changing hands in the daily business of buying and selling.


Copyright AFP

SUbject: French news

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