Train collision rescue operations wind up

13th October 2006, Comments 0 comments

ZOUFFTGEN, France, Oct 13, 2006 (AFP) - Rescue operations at the scene of a train collision in northeast France ended early Friday after a sixth body was pulled from the wreckage, police said, amid suspicions that human error was to blame for the carnage.

ZOUFFTGEN, France, Oct 13, 2006 (AFP) - Rescue operations at the scene of a train collision in northeast France ended early Friday after a sixth body was pulled from the wreckage, police said, amid suspicions that human error was to blame for the carnage.

"Fire fighters ended (search) operations around 4am. No other casualties have been found," Julien Charles, cabinet chief of the Moselle region's leader, told AFP.

The body of the last victim, a French national, was retrieved from the wreckage Thursday shortly before midnight.

Two people were seriously hurt in the accident and 14 others suffered minor injuries or were treated for shock.

More than 250 rescue workers had cut into the scattered wagons of the passenger train involved.

The accident occurred Wednesday when a passenger train from Luxembourg carrying around 20 people and a goods train smashed head-on near this village just 1.5 kilometres south of the Luxembourg border.

The two trains hit each other on a bend as they moved in opposite directions along the same track while a parallel line was undergoing maintenance work.

They collided with such impact that the locomotive of the freight train mounted the front of the passenger train, sending several wagons scissoring out into woods alongside the track.

An onboard data recorder from the passenger train was Thursday recovered from the wreckage of one of the trains.

A regional French official, Bertrand Mertz, and French rail unions speculated that the driver of the passenger train had ignored a red light.

"If everything was operating as it should have, a human error looks likely," one union representative, Bernard Aubin, said.

Copyright AFP

Subject: French news

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