The father of liquid-crystal display dies at 74

22nd May 2007, Comments 0 comments

PARIS, May 22, 2007 (AFP) - French Nobel laureate Pierre-Gilles de Gennes, a pioneer of the liquid crystal display (LCDs) that is now a standard technology in today's consumer gadgetry, has died, his family said on Tuesday.

PARIS, May 22, 2007 (AFP) - French Nobel laureate Pierre-Gilles de Gennes, a pioneer of the liquid crystal display (LCDs) that is now a standard technology in today's consumer gadgetry, has died, his family said on Tuesday.

De Gennes, who was 74, won the 1991 Nobel Prize for Physics for groundbreaking work in liquid crystals and polymers. He died on Friday.

Born in Paris in 1932, de Gennes graduated from the elite Ecole Normale Superieure school, working firstly in neutron scattering and magnetism before moving to the realm of supraconductors and later to liquid crystals.

His book The Physics of Liquid Crystals", published in 1974, remains the benchmark work in this field.

De Gennes had an interest in many fields, rounding up his career at the Institut Curie in Paris, where he worked on cellular adhesion and brain function.

He had a deep love of painting and drawing, was a fan of Japanese art and wrote a satirical book, "Petit Point" (Small Point), lampooning characters from the academic and industrial world.

In 1997, he even took part in a movie about Pierre and Marie Curie, playing the role of delivery man alongside French stars Isabelle Huppert and Philippe Noiret.


Copyright AFP

Subject: French news

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