Royal promises change without 'brutality'

22nd April 2007, Comments 0 comments

PARIS, April 22, 2007 (AFP) - Socialist Segolene Royal called Sunday for voters to rally round her for the presidential run-off, promising to bring France change without upheaval.

PARIS, April 22, 2007 (AFP) - Socialist Segolene Royal called Sunday for voters to rally round her for the presidential run-off, promising to bring France change without upheaval.

"I call on all those who... believe it is possible to reform France without brutalising it, who want a triumph of human values over the stockmarket, who want an end to the painful rise of insecurity and precarity, to come together," she told a rally in central-western France.

Royal and right-winger Nicolas Sarkozy, 52 will face off in a May 6 run-off vote after topping the multi-candidate first round on Sunday.

The 53-year-old candidate for the Socialist Party (PS) won some 26 percent of the first round vote, compared to around 30 percent for Sarkozy, according to projections.

"A new campaign is beginning. In two weeks, France is going to choose its destiny and it face," Royal told cheering supporters.

"We have a clear choice between two, very different projects for society. I reach out to all those who believe it is not only possible but urgent to break with a system that is no longer working.

"Many of us -- regardless of the first round -- do not want a France ruled by the law of the strongest or the most brutal, sewn-up by money interests, where all powers are concentrated in the same few hands.

"As you know I am a free woman, as you are a free people. I am not hostage to any clan, to any pressure group, to any financial power.

"I appeal to all those who believe there is no freedom without justice, no economic efficiency without social progress," she said, promising to set "fair rules for globalisation" and to fight "the social regression that comes when we surrender to unfettered economic liberalism."

Royal -- who fought off competition for the centre-left vote from the centrist Francois Bayrou -- said she understood the "disappointment" of all those who backed losing candidates in the first round, promising to be the "custodian of an impartial state."


Copyright AFP

Subject: French news


Copyright AFP

Subject: French news

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