Royal attacked over defeat by Socialist ally

27th June 2007, Comments 0 comments

PARIS, June 27, 2007 (AFP) - France's defeated presidential candidate Segolene Royal was attacked by fellow Socialist Laurent Fabius Wednesday for wrecking her own chances with an inadequate campaign.

PARIS, June 27, 2007 (AFP) - France's defeated presidential candidate Segolene Royal was attacked by fellow Socialist Laurent Fabius Wednesday for wrecking her own chances with an inadequate campaign.

In an interview with Le Monde newspaper the former prime minister said Royal had suffered from a "triple deficit: she wasn't presidential enough, she wasn't credible enough, she wasn't collective enough."

"You can't win a presidential election by asking everyone what he or she wants," he said, in a clear reference to Royal's scheme of nationwide public discussions.

"You need a vision, a design that will push France and the French forward, and you need to convince people you are capable of leading them," said the leader of the party's left-wing faction.

According to Fabius, the election should have been in the Socialists' grasp.

"When the candidate was officially nominated (in November 2006), she had 55 percent in the polls ... It is unfortunate that at the end of the campaign this had fallen to 47 percent. We have to explain this failure not deny it," he said.

"Nicolas Sarkozy was elected on the basis of one decisive criterion: he was deemed more capable of running the country than Segolene Royal," he said.

Asked to respond to Royal's charge that she had insufficient support from party leaders like himself, Fabius replied: "Rather it was our candidate who chose to keep the party's top officials at arm's length. It was her decision."

The Socialists have been in the throes of bitter infighting since last month's presidential election, as rival groups vie to control the process of party reform.

Royal has indicated she sees herself as the party's best hope and plans to run again at the 2012 presidential election.

Last week she announced she had split from the party's First Secretary Francois Hollande, who was her partner for many years.


Copyright AFP

SUbject: French news

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