Parliamentary elections: the line-up

6th June 2007, Comments 0 comments

PARIS, June 6, 2007 (AFP) - Over 80 political parties are fielding candidates in at least some of France's 577 constituencies for Sunday's parliamentary election, but only a handful are likely to win seats.

PARIS, June 6, 2007 (AFP) - Over 80 political parties are fielding candidates in at least some of France's 577 constituencies for Sunday's parliamentary election, but only a handful are likely to win seats.

Thumbnail portraits of the main contenders:

Union for a Popular Movement (UMP)

The centre-right party of Nicolas Sarkozy, the freshly-elected president, controls an absolute majority of 359 seats in the outgoing parliament, and is expected to maintain its dominance in the new National Assembly.

The "New Centre"

A party set up by deputies formerly allied to the unsuccessful presidential candidate Francois Bayrou, but who have decided to throw in their lot with Sarkozy's UMP. Thanks to an electoral agreement with the UMP, they expect to win around 25 of the 29 seats that Bayrou's UDF party had in the outgoing Assembly.

The Democratic Movement:

This new centrist party, popularly known as "MoDem," was set up by Bayrou after he failed to win the presidency.

Due to the defection of most of his former allies to the New Centre, Bayrou's party is considered unlikely to win more than five or six seats at the most.

The Socialist Party (PS)

The once dominant party of the late president Francois Mitterrand, the centre-left PS controls only 149 seats in the outgoing Assembly. It hopes to retain a similar number.

The Communist Party (PCF)

In the outgoing Assembly the PCF just managed to form a parliamentary group, with 21 members or allies. Given its poor showing in the presidential vote, it is expected to be reduced to fringe status with at best only five or six members.

 The Greens

The small Green Party (Les Verts) is expected to win around four seats, against three in the outgoing parliament.

The Revolutionary Communist League (LCR)

The Troskyist LCR, which came out best among far left parties in the presidential election, will be fielding an unprecedented 500 candidates. It is however unlikely to win any seats.

The National Front (FN)

The FN has no seats in the outgoing parliament, despite its score of over 16 percent in the first round of the 2002 presidential election.
 
Unless candidates from the major conservative parties court controversy by striking local deals with it for the second round of voting, the FN will not win any seats in the new parliament.


Copyright AFP

Subject: French news

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