Paris queues for view of Concorde bits

16th November 2003, Comments 0 comments

PARIS, Nov 9 (AFP) - Concorde showed its continued pulling-power Sunday as crowds of Parisians turned out to view parts of a dismembered airliner - including nose-cone, pilots' seats and a complete set of in-flight crockery - which go on sale at a charity auction later this week. Air France, which flew its last supersonic service in May, has asked Christie's France to auction a number of pieces and mementos of the historic jet in order to raise money for a children's fund that it runs.

PARIS, Nov 9 (AFP) - Concorde showed its continued pulling-power Sunday as crowds of Parisians turned out to view parts of a dismembered airliner - including nose-cone, pilots' seats and a complete set of in-flight crockery - which go on sale at a charity auction later this week.
 
Air France, which flew its last supersonic service in May, has asked Christie's France to auction a number of pieces and mementos of the historic jet in order to raise money for a children's fund that it runs.

Among the 180 items to go on sale on Saturday are parts of the Olympus 593 engines, which powered the airliner at speeds of up to 2,200 kilometres (1,275 miles) per hour and are widely considered a triumph of engineering.

A radome - the trademark 3.5 metre cone at the end of the plane's nose - is regarded as the centre-piece of the auction with an estimated price of EUR 10,000- EUR15,000 (USD 11,500- USD17.300).

From inside the aircraft collectors can snap up parts from the instrument panel, including the Machmeter or speedometer, as well as crew seats and kitchen items including sets of designer porcelain used for in-flight meal service.

The sale also includes sections of fuselage and windscreen, a complete set of maintenance records, bespoke tool-kits, several scale models, and photographs charting the airliner's 27 years of commercial flying.

Air France and British Airways - the only two airlines to fly Concorde - this year both stopped supersonic flights because of doubts about their economic feasibility as the aircraft age.

In July 2000 an Air France Concorde crashed outside Paris killing 113 people, and a technical flaw in the wing-based fuel tanks was blamed.


© AFP


Subject: French news

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