Parents appeal to daughter's killer in Ireland

11th December 2006, Comments 0 comments

DUBLIN, Dec 9, 2006 (AFP) - The parents of murdered French film producer Sophie Toscan du Plantier accused her killer Saturday of "cowardice and perversity", nearly 10 years since she was beaten to death in south-west Ireland.

DUBLIN, Dec 9, 2006 (AFP) - The parents of murdered French film producer Sophie Toscan du Plantier accused her killer Saturday of "cowardice and perversity", nearly 10 years since she was beaten to death in south-west Ireland.

In an open letter to the Irish Times, George and Marguerite Bouniol said the murderer, who has never been caught, had also killed them and contrasted his actions with the country their daughter had come to love.

"When you murder someone, it's the family you kill. At first, one doesn't understand. Then the pain comes. Then despair, and an unbearable absence," they wrote.

"And today you live in peace, free, without regrets. There's an arrogant, contemptuous look in your eyes, the look of a predator looking forward to his next victim. Your whole life has been one of cowardice and perversity.

"This Ireland which Sophie taught us to love, and which we love; this Ireland - we want to know how can it accept that such a heinous crime go unpunished."

No-one has ever been charged with the murder of du Plantier, the wife of the late Daniel Toscan du Plantier, the former chief of France's Gaumont film studios.

Du Plantier was 39 when she was found beaten to death on December 23, 1996 in a lane leading to her holiday home in the Toomore Valley on the Mizen peninsula in County Cork.

The Bouniols travel to Ireland from their home in Paris every year to attend a memorial mass for their daughter in west Cork and to lay flowers at the spot where her body was found.

They told the newspaper they have exhausted every legal recourse. They could not file a suit for denial of justice with the European Court of Human Rights because the investigation is not formally closed in Ireland.

"We're blocked in every direction. We can go nowhere for justice," Marguerite Bouniol said.

"Writing this letter was our way of saying we haven't forgotten. It is a letter of despair."

Irish police are currently finalising a wide-ranging review of the investigation of du Plantier's murder.

It follows allegations by a key witness in the Garda (police) case, Marie Farrell, that pressure was put on her by investigating officers to make a false statement that she had seen journalist Ian Bailey near du Plantier's home on the night she was killed.

The review team was set up by the head of Ireland's police, Commissioner Noel Conroy, in response to concerns about police behaviour.

Police have twice held Bailey for questioning in connection with the killing. He has consistently protested his innocence.

In December 2002, lawyers for the Bouniols lodged a civil legal action against Bailey in Ireland's High Court seeking damages from him.

They decided not to proceed with the case earlier this year.

Copyright AFP

Subject: French news

 

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