Opposition seeks to block law on transport strikes

7th August 2007, Comments 0 comments

PARIS, Aug 7, 2007 (AFP) - France's Socialist opposition on Tuesday filed to block a government-backed law aimed at keeping public trains running during transport strikes, on the grounds that it undermined the legal right to strike.

PARIS, Aug 7, 2007 (AFP) - France's Socialist opposition on Tuesday filed to block a government-backed law aimed at keeping public trains running during transport strikes, on the grounds that it undermined the legal right to strike.

Promised by President Nicolas Sarkozy during his election campaign and backed by 70 percent of the public, the bill was adopted by parliament last Thursday despite opposition from trade unions and the political left.

The Socialist Party and its allies lodged a complaint with France's highest administrative court, the Constitutional Council, to have the law repealed on the grounds that it "implicitly prevents the exercise of the right to strike."

They say that in order to ensure at least skeleton transport services at certain times of the day, as planned under the law, some workers would have to forfeit their right to strike.

Another contested clause is one that obliges workers to declare 48 hours before a stoppage if they intend to take part, and another that requires a secret ballot of workers after eight days on whether to continue a strike.

Unions, who failed to mobilise large numbers of protestors against the law over the summer holiday period, have promised more action, possibly during the Rugby World Cup which runs from September 8 to October 20.

AFP

Subject: French news

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