Nobel Prize-winning novelist Claude Simon dies

11th July 2005, Comments 0 comments

PARIS, July 9 (AFP) - French novelist Claude Simon, a leading light in the French 'nouveau roman' movement and winner of the Nobel prize for literature in 1985, has died, his publishers announced Saturday. He was 91.

PARIS, July 9 (AFP) - French novelist Claude Simon, a leading light in the French 'nouveau roman' movement and winner of the Nobel prize for literature in 1985, has died, his publishers announced Saturday. He was 91.

He emerged in the 1950s as a leading exponent of the nouveau roman, or 'new novel', writing in a style characterised by interior monologues and an absence of punctuation.

His works include 'Le Tricheur' (The Trickster, 1945), 'Le Vent' (The Wind, 1959) and 'La Route des Flandres (The Road to Flanders, 1960).

His publishing house, Editions de Minuit, said he died on Wednesday and was buried in Paris on Saturday.

Born on October 10, 1913, in Antananarivo, Madagascar, which was then a French colony, he went on to study in Paris, Oxford and Cambridge.

Simon was just 10 years old when his mother died and he was sent to live with his grandmother in the southern French city of Perpignan. His father had been killed in World War I, a year after he was born.

In 1936 he played a role in supporting the Republican side in the Spanish Civil War, and later fought in France's brief and ill-fated campaign against the invading German armies, being captured and then escaping in 1940.

Making his way back to the Perpignan region, in the part of France that was not occupied by the Germans, he was able to purchase a vineyard.

Soon after the war he published his first novel, 'Le Tricheur.'

He wrote three more novels before gaining international recognition with 'La Route des Flandres' and the Medici Prize-winning 'Histoire' (History, 1967).

The two novels, with his 1962 work 'Palace' (The Palace), formed a trilogy based on his experiences during the Spanish Civil War.

In 1981 Simon published an historical epic 'Les Georgiques' before being awarded the Nobel prize for literature in 1985.

His last work 'Le Tramway' (The Tramway - 2001) was based on his life, from childhood to old age.

Copyright AFP

Subject: French news

0 Comments To This Article