Mystery over concentration camp baby resolved

15th May 2007, Comments 0 comments

NANCY, France, May 15, 2007 (AFP) - The mystery over whether a French resistance fighter and a man born in a Nazi concentration camp are father and son was resolved when DNA tests confirmed they are not related.

NANCY, France, May 15, 2007 (AFP) - The mystery over whether a French resistance fighter and a man born in a Nazi concentration camp are father and son was resolved when DNA tests confirmed they are not related.

Bob Nant, 83, and Robert Nant, 62, had asked a court in the eastern city of Nancy to undergo DNA testing to determine whether the young Nant may have been fathered by Bob Nant during a one-night encounter with his mother Paulette during the war.

But lawyers representing the two men said Monday in a statement that "tests conducted from blood samples taken from Messieurs Bob Nant.. and Robert Nant rule out any relation between them."

The story began in the summer of 1944 when Nant senior went into hiding at a house in the eastern town of Villefranche and met Paulette, an informant working for the French resistance.

Nine months later, a baby was born on March 19, 1945 in a camp annexed to the Buchenwald concentration camp where Paulette had been deported.

Paulette died in the camp, but the baby, whom she named Robert Nant, survived and grew up in a foster family.

In June 1006, Bob Nant, who lives in the Alpine town of Chambery, hired a private detective to find the man, having learned that the woman had given birth.

The detective tracked him down and Nant senior sent him a letter.

The two men agreed to the DNA test and promised to meet if it turned out that they were related.


Copyright AFP

Subject: French news

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