Metro bomber may finally be extradited to France

26th September 2005, Comments 0 comments

LONDON, Sept 26 (AFP) - British judges will review next month an appeal against extradition to France by an Algerian, Rachid Ramda, who is wanted in connection with 1995 Paris metro attacks and has been linked to the head of a suspected militant Islamist cell dismantled by French authorities Monday, the British Home Office said.

LONDON, Sept 26 (AFP) - British judges will review next month an appeal against extradition to France by an Algerian, Rachid Ramda, who is wanted in connection with 1995 Paris metro attacks and has been linked to the head of a suspected militant Islamist cell dismantled by French authorities Monday, the British Home Office said.

Home secretary Charles Clarke in April gave his support to the extradition request first made by France in 1995. But lawyers for Ramda filed a new appeal in July and now that is scheduled to be heard on October 14.

The judicial review "is essentially when a judge can review whether a decision made by the government or a public body is lawful," a spokesman for the Home Office said.

"It's a judge looking at the decision to the surrender Rachid Ramda," said the spokesman. If the judge approves the government's decision to extradite Ramda, "I believe that that would be a final course of appeal," the spokesman added.

But the judge could also ask the government to review its decision as it did back in 2002.

Ramda, 35, is suspected of having financed with others the attack at the Saint-Michel RER train station in Paris in July 1995, which left eight people dead and 150 injured.

He was arrested in London in November 1995 and Paris has been trying ever since to extradite him from Britain.

During a series of dawn raids west of Paris early Monday, French police detained nine people in a crackdown on suspected Islamist terrorist activities.

Among those being held was the suspected head of the cell Safe Bourada, who was released from prison in 2003 after serving five years for helping organise bomb attacks in France in 1995 for the Algerian Armed Islamic Group (GIA). Bourada knew Ramda, according to sources close to the inquiry.

Ramda is currently the longest held detainee in Britain in an extradition procedure.

Copyright AFP

Subject: French news

0 Comments To This Article