'Lady Chatterley' sweeps Cesar film awards

26th February 2007, Comments 0 comments

PARIS, Feb 25, 2007 (AFP) - "Lady Chatterley", a steamy but critically acclaimed version of D.H. Lawrence's classic novel of passion and deception, won the best film and four other top prizes at France's Cesars film awards on Saturday.

PARIS, Feb 25, 2007 (AFP) - "Lady Chatterley", a steamy but critically acclaimed version of D.H. Lawrence's classic novel of passion and deception, won the best film and four other top prizes at France's Cesars film awards on Saturday.

"Little Miss Sunshine" was named best foreign film at the awards in Paris, which came on the eve of the Oscars in Hollywood where the American movie was again a contender.

"Lady Chatterley" directed by Pascal Ferran beat the main favourite, World War II saga "Indigenes" ("Days of Glory"), to take the premier award for best picture as well as picking up Best Actress for Marina Hands.

Ferran's film also won awards for best adaption, best costume and best photography.

Ferran told of the onerous cost of making only her third movie -- and her first in 11 years.

"I don't know if I should say that but at the end of the film we were so ruined that we could not even have a party worthy of the name, so I would like to ask all the technicians and artists to come on stage because the party is now!," she said.

"This evening you have given us the most beautiful of Cesars which rewards the whole team," Ferran told the audience of top French film stars, directors and executives.

Several film versions have been made of Lawrence's story of an affair between Lady Chatterley and her gamekeeper. The explicit language and sex scenes caused a sensation when published in Britain in 1960, resulting in Penguin Books being taken to court in a much-publicised obscenity trial.

While some of the movie versions have been ridiculed by critics, Le Monde newspaper said Ferran's version -- taken from a second version of the novel that Lawrence wrote -- was full of "primitive and sensual beauty".

Ferran's first full-length movie, "Petits Arrangements avec les Morts" (Coming to Terms with the Dead) won a prize at the 1994 Cannes film festival and in 1995 he scored a critical success with "L'Age des Possibles."

"Little Miss Sunshine" pipped Pedro Almodovar's Spanish movie "Volvar" and British director Stephen Frears' "The Queen" to take Best Foreign Film.

The film -- which was also nominated for four Oscars and has already won a top British award, a BAFTA -- is directed by Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris and tells a story of a dysfunctional American family whose daughter dreams of winning a beauty pageant.

Guillaume Canet won the Best Director Cesar for his thriller "Ne Le Dis A Personne" (Don't Tell Anyone), which gained four awards: best director, best actor for Francois Luzet, best music for Mathieu Chedid and best montage.

It got nine nominations, as did "Indigenes" by Rachid Bouchareb, which despite it's favourite status got only the prize for best original screenplay. The movie is in contention for best foreign film at the Oscars and Bouchareb was to fly immediately to Hollywood.

Kad Merad walked away with Best Supporting Actor Cesar for "Je Vais Bien, Ne T'en Fais Pas."

British actor Jude Law was given a special award Cesar at the ceremony.

Copyright AFP

Subject: French news

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