Gaultier, Saab wrap up haute couture shows

10th July 2006, Comments 0 comments

PARIS, July 8, 2006 (AFP) - Jean Paul Gaultier was on form Friday, with a collection full of humour, feathers and fur, while a fresh-faced vitality defined Elie Saab's version of glamour on the final day of the Paris winter haute couture shows.

PARIS, July 8, 2006 (AFP) - Jean Paul Gaultier was on form Friday, with a collection full of humour, feathers and fur, while a fresh-faced vitality defined Elie Saab's version of glamour on the final day of the Paris winter haute couture shows.

 

While the fashion crowd wilted in the Paris summer heatwave, Gaultier stepped up the use of fur, such as fox which ran around the neck or trimmed coat sleeves, a jacket or even a python blouson.

 

The French designer also loves feathers. He offered a jacket in black rooster feathers of which one sleeve was winged, as well as a slightly surreal dress coat with a rooster perched on the arm.

 

The fashion crowd was appreciative.

 

US singer Cher and French actress Catherine Deneuve were star guests at the show, on the last of three days of haute couture collections for autumn-winter 2006-07.

 

Gaultier also let his wit and charm run free on light dresses in organza or chiffon. A 'Little Black Dress' had an embroidered skeleton on the back; another in amethyst had strips like ribs.

 

And he had fun with chandeliers - a bustier was embroidered with crystals, while a chandelier print adorned a satin dress and, for a finale, his 'bride' wore a chandelier as a headdress under her veil.

 

At Lebanon's Elie Saab, fresh-faced models' loosely swept-back hair worn in high ponytails said it all - these dresses needed no additional embellishment to make an impression.

 

Although he kicked off with shorter outfits, they betrayed all the intricate savoir-faire that goes into these entirely hand-made garments, with gorgeous embroidery in pearls, sequins and Swarovski crystals.

 

Dresses were often accompanied by jackets, at times with a sense of the 1950s or 1960s and would be equally appealing to young and older women alike with a taste for luxury.

 

But Saab really shone with his floor-sweeping evening gowns, which had a youth and modernity sure to enrapture any young style-sensitive starlet stepping into the spotlight.

 

Glamour was rejuvenated with touches like a bib front on a dress, a halter neck, fringing mirrored front and back, a simple scarf tightly tied at the neck or a cluster of scrunchy flowers.

 

He 'patchworked' lace, beading, or draping, mixed shiny and matt blacks and threw in geometric patterns, as well as subtle aubergine, emerald or petrol blue. But the effect was never over the top.

 

Meanwhile, French fashion house Carven returned to the official haute couture calendar on Friday after a four-year absence, under the design helm of Pascal Millet.

 

A lime band at the waist of a black skirt, dainty gloves in purple or green or an oversized belt buckle in a wardrobe of fitted jackets and straight skirts added up to a vision of sassy Parisian elegance, with a dollop of flirty sensuality.

 

Carmen Carven, who founded the fashion house in 1945 and herself turns 97 on August 31, attended the show.

 

If haute couture is all about being presented in a spectacular way but also being wearable, Franck Sorbier captured its spirit with sophisticated, diverse choices in guipure, lace, wool satin, silk, pearl embroidery and crushed velvet.

 

Staged in a Paris centre big top, he chose a circus theme with the models each a circus act, like the trapeze artist or knife-thrower, wandering among papier mâché animals.

 

A full-skirted dress with puffed shoulders, shaped and buttoned into the small of the back with a feather collar resembled a spinning top in gleaming white with black heart, moon or star motifs.

 

While a red and black off-the-shoulder dress was full of 1950s femininity, trouser suits offered another stylish option, with cinched jackets over roomy pleated trousers.

 

Copyright AFP

 

Subject: French News

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