French tribute to journalists killed on the job

30th July 2004, Comments 0 comments

PARIS, July 29 (AFP) - French Culture Minister Renaud Donnedieu de Vabres on Thursday led a tribute to journalists who died or were killed in the line of duty, unveiling a commemorative plaque to the "victims of a duty to inform".

PARIS, July 29 (AFP) - French Culture Minister Renaud Donnedieu de Vabres on Thursday led a tribute to journalists who died or were killed in the line of duty, unveiling a commemorative plaque to the "victims of a duty to inform".

The ceremony at the Square for Human Rights and Freedoms on the massive Trocadero plaza across the river from the Eiffel Tower marked the 123rd anniversary of the July 29, 1881 French law on freedom of the press.

Donnedieu de Vabres saluted the "memory of these men and women who pay the highest price, that of their life, for their commitment to a craft that is more than a profession, but a true passion for information, events and history."

The minister recalled the killing last year of French radio correspondent Jean Helene in Ivory Coast, and said he hoped all would be done to shed light on the disappearance there of French-Canadian journalist Guy-Andre Kieffer.

In 2003, 42 journalists were killed around the world, according to Paris-based media watchdog Reporters without Borders (RSF). The World Association of Newspapers put the figure at 53.

Donnedieu de Vabres also unveiled an exhibition of 40 Agence France-Presse photographs, displayed along either side of the square on giant two-by-four meter (yard) panels.

The images depict some of the most remarkable news events of recent years: the September 11, 2001 attacks in the United States and wars in Iraq, Ivory Coast and Liberia.

© AFP

Subject: French news

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