French film fest awards Japanese director

11th March 2005, Comments 0 comments

DEAUVILLE, France, March 11 (AFP) - Japanese director Takashi Miike, who was honored at the Asian film festival in the French seaside resort of Deauville, says despite his penchant for violence, he hopes to make movies for children.

DEAUVILLE, France, March 11 (AFP) - Japanese director Takashi Miike, who was honored at the Asian film festival in the French seaside resort of Deauville, says despite his penchant for violence, he hopes to make movies for children.

"Filming extremes is not an end in and of itself, but a way to express how I feel," Miike, who received a special award for his work late Thursday, told AFP in an interview.

"My ideal situation would be to be able to make films that children can enjoy. I'm obviously not talking about showing them violence - I think they see enough of that every day - but the idea would be to be able to relive things I went through as a child," Miike explained.

Miike, known for the explicit depiction of violence and sex in his work, has made 75 feature-length films for television, the straight-to-video market in the big screen since the 1990s.

Born in Osaka in 1960, Miike initially had no interest in cinema, instead pursuing his passion for motorbikes.

But, realising he was not good enough to compete professionally, Miike enrolled at the prestigious Japanese Academy of Moving Images in Yokohama run by renowned director Shohei Imamura.

"The idea was to gain some time, to avoid becoming the adult that I was asked to become. I liked watching films, but I never thought I would direct one someday," Miike said.

His first theatrically released film, "Shinjuku Triad Society", led critics to describe him as an up-and-coming director. In 1996, Time Magazine ranked his second feature film "Fudoh" as one of the 10 best of the year.

Among Miike's other best-known films - which often combine violence, romance and humour in an unexpected way - are "Rainy Dog" and the "Dead or Alive" trilogy.

When asked about his prolific production, Miike said: "I don't make any claim to fame by the number of films I make. It's a natural process. I like film sets, and I'm used to filming within narrow time constraints."

He also paid tribute to Imamura, explaining: "By observing him, I learned not to conform to stereotypes that crop up about cinema or being a director.

He also taught me to look to make films about subjects that truly belonged to me."

The Asian film festival in Deauville, located on France's Normandy coast, ends on Sunday. Nine are competing for the coveted Golden Lotus best film award, including three Japanese films. Miike's work is not in competition.

© AFP

Subject: French News

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