French city powers buses with food scraps

20th September 2007, Comments 0 comments

20 September 2007, LILLE (AFP) - The French city of Lille is to power a 100-strong bus fleet using biogas fuel made from organic household waste, thanks to a pioneering recycling plant unveiled on Wednesday.

20 September 2007

LILLE (AFP) - The French city of Lille is to power a 100-strong bus fleet using biogas fuel made from organic household waste, thanks to a pioneering recycling plant unveiled on Wednesday.

In a project unique in Europe, the plant will supply the northern city with four million cubic metres of eco-friendly biogas per year -- enough to power 100 buses -- produced from food scraps, weeds, flowers and grass clippings.

It is to start supplying the city's existing fleet of natural gas-powered buses later this year, and is to be fully operational by end 2008, handling 108,600 tonnes of green waste per year.

"There is no more accomplished example of using a local resource to power a local fleet. The cycle is complete," said Eric Quiquet, an urbanism official at Lille city hall.

France's fourth largest city, with a population of 1.1 million people, Lille has been an early adopter of green urban technologies.

Biogas, produced by decomposing organic material via a process called biomethanisation, emits far less carbon dioxide than traditional fossil fuels. Sweden launched the world's first biogas-fulled train in 2005.

A 150-strong bus depot has been built next to Lille's Centre for Organic Recovery, to provide a direct fuel supply.

The country's only biogas fuel plant is also equipped to transfer non-recyclable waste via local waterways for incineration at a nearby energy-optimisation centre.

AFP

Subject: French news

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