French, Belgian police hold 'killer' summit

15th July 2004, Comments 0 comments

DINANT, Belgium, July 15 (AFP) - French and Belgian magistrates charged with investigating the activities of French self-confessed serial killer Michel Fourniret met in the south Belgian town of Dinant on Thursday to compare notes and assess progress in the 11 crimes attributed to him.

DINANT, Belgium, July 15 (AFP) - French and Belgian magistrates charged with investigating the activities of French self-confessed serial killer Michel Fourniret met in the south Belgian town of Dinant on Thursday to compare notes and assess progress in the 11 crimes attributed to him.  

At the same time police in Switzerland announced they had sent details about the disappearance of five children between 1981 and 1986 to the Belgian authorities.  

 Yves Charpenel, public prosecutor in the north central French city of Reims, told reporters that the aim of the meeting in Dinant had been to establish the overall state of play of the investigation.  

"We now have 11 criminal investigations, all extremely serious," he said, thereby confirming a report in the Belgian press on Wednesday that Fourniret had confessed to another kidnapping -- that of a young north African woman in the Ardennes region of northeastern France in 1998.  

Fourniret, a carpenter, has so far confessed to nine murders in France and Belgium, eight of them of girls and women. His wife has accused him of a 10th killing, that of an unidentified young au pair girl in 1993, whose body was said to be buried near Dinant.  

Belgian television reported that Fourniret had also confessed to the kidnapping and rape of the north African woman but police said she had not been raped and that Fourniret said he had left her alive.  

"The cooperation is effective, our work is progressing well," said Jocelyne Bodson, a senior legal official from the eastern Belgian city of Liege.  

"Several timetables" were drawn up for the various investigations requested by French authorities in Nantes, Auxerre, Versailles and Reims, Charpenel said.  

He said the French justice minister would decide within the next few days whether the various investigations should be centralised.  

"Not all the bodies have been found. There is urgency, there are worried families, bodies to be discovered," Cedric Visart de Bocarme, a prosecutor from the southern Belgian town of Namur, told the meeting.  

Sources close to the investigation have said that French police are re-examining 30 unsolved murders in France while Belgian police are trying to discover if Fourniret was linked to the disappearances of at least 15 other girls over the past 20 years whose bodies have never been found.  

The decision by Swiss police to send details of the unsolved disappearances of five children aged between six and 14 to the Belgian authorities did not mean they were linking them to Fourniret, Swiss police said.  

"It is just a matter of making contact with the Belgian authorities and showing that after all this time we have not forgotten these children," a spokesman said.  

Last week German police probing unsolved murders sent details to their Belgian colleagues.

 

© AFP

 

Subject: French news

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