Discotheque bouncers fined for discrimination

14th June 2007, Comments 0 comments

PARIS, June 14, 2007 (AFP) - Five employees from four Paris discotheques were fined on Thursday for discrimination after they turned away clubgoers of African and Arab origin.

PARIS, June 14, 2007 (AFP) - Five employees from four Paris discotheques were fined on Thursday for discrimination after they turned away clubgoers of African and Arab origin.

The bouncers were fined as a result of an operation mounted in 2005 by the anti-racism organisation SOS Racisme in which groups of young blacks, Arabs and whites, dressed in similar attire, were sent to clubs across France to try to uncover incidences of discrimination.

A Paris court ordered one of the bouncers to pay 1,000 euros (1,330 dollars) and the three others were given a suspended fine of 1,500 euros.

It was the first time that a Paris court gave a ruling based on the results of the anti-discrimination operation, which are considered admissible evidence since 2002.

The five employees who worked at chic clubs on Paris' Champs Elysees pleaded guilty to "discrimination based on origin, ethnicity and nationality" in the case.  Charges were dropped against two others.

SOS Racisme Vice President Samuel Thomas described the ruling as "an important victory," noting that the evidence came from the operation to show that racist criteria were used to grant entry into the establishment.

The clubs were not charged with any wrondgoing in the case.

The Paris tribunal ruled that while some employees "naturally dispose of certain freedom in assessing whether to admit or refuse clients, the comparison between the two groups of young people showed that there was no other reason" than racial discrimination to refuse entry.

The court also denied a request by prosecutors that the clubs be ordered to display the ruling at their entrances.


Copyright AFP

Subject: French news

0 Comments To This Article