Diehard security at Bruce Willis Parisian film preview

14th June 2007, Comments 0 comments

PARIS, June 14, 2007 (AFP) - Highlighting Hollywood's combat against movie piracy, Twentieth Century Fox threw up stringent security measures at a select world preview in Paris of the latest Bruce Willis epic "Die Hard 4".

PARIS, June 14, 2007 (AFP) - Highlighting Hollywood's combat against movie piracy, Twentieth Century Fox threw up stringent security measures at a select world preview in Paris of the latest Bruce Willis epic "Die Hard 4".

"US studios are very reticent about screening movies ahead of release and we personally guaranteed there would nobody inside the cinema whom we did not have entire confidence in," Alexis Rubinowicz, communications official for Fox France, said ahead of the screening Wednesday.

The few dozen journalists filtered through the doors for the world's first preview of the film watched the more than two-hour flick under the unflinching gaze of two security guards.

"If we see anything on Internet before June 27 (the US release date) the next blockbuster will only be shown on the eve of its release," Rubinowicz added.

Ahead of the warning, relayed by a message on screen, the small media pack had their bags searched and were asked: "Do you have any taping equipment on you?"

Surveillance was equally tight a few months back at a special press screening in Paris of Columbia's 21st James Bond movie, "Casino Royale."

The head of Fox France, Jose Covo, told AFP on Thursday that "For all big world releases we are extremely vigilant, we do everything possible to avoid piracy."

The movie could be copied "at each stage", he said, sometimes "at the laboratory, and often you can find it on Internet in the days or weeks following its release."

Covo said Fox recently identified three sources for bootlegged versions of "Spider Man 3", its latest box-office hit, which has marked up 844 million dollars in world revenue.

Spider Man's exploits were copied "in Russia and in a small cinema in France," he said.

Canada this month followed in the footsteps of Japan with new rules against movie piracy which US majors say is bleeding the industry.

Piracy costs Hollywood six billion US dollars annually, said Canada's Heritage Minister Bev Oda, and 20-25 percent of unauthorized recordings of films distributed globally originate from Canada.

In May, Warner Bros. said it would cancel its sneak preview screenings in Canada, starting with this summer's releases of "Ocean's Thirteen" and the next "Harry Potter" film due out on June 28.


Copyright AFP

Subject: French news

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