Court shoots down hiring and firing contract

6th July 2007, Comments 0 comments

PARIS, July 6, 2007 (AFP) - A Paris appeals court ruled Friday that a recent French law aimed at encouraging firms to hire new people by making it easy to fire them contravenes international labour law.

PARIS, July 6, 2007 (AFP) - A Paris appeals court ruled Friday that a recent French law aimed at encouraging firms to hire new people by making it easy to fire them contravenes international labour law.

The law, which came into force on August 4, 2005, was initiated by then prime minister Dominique de Villepin in the face of opposition from unions and applies to companies with fewer than 20 workers.

The labour contract, of indefinite duration, is aimed at creating jobs by easing constraints faced by such employers on firing workers.

In particular, employers can dismiss workers during the first two years of employment without giving a reason.

The court of appeal was ruling on an earlier decision by a lower court that the contract was contrary to international law.

In its ruling Friday, the appeals court said that in the first two years of employment the CNE deprives the worker of most of his rights when it comes to dismissal under international standards laid down by the International Labour Organisation.

If fired the onus is on the worker to prove that the dismissal is unjustified.

"In the fight against unemployment the protection of workers in their jobs seems to be a means at least as pertinent as the facility given to employers to fire them," it said, adding it was "at the very least paradoxal to encourage hiring by facilitating firing."


Copyright AFP

Subject: French news

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