British inquiry 'the final word' on Diana's Paris death

2nd August 2004, Comments 0 comments

LONDON, July 31 (AFP) - Britain's top policeman has promised that an inquiry he is leading into the death of Princess Diana will be the final word on the issue, and should put an end to the myriad conspiracy theories linked to her demise.

LONDON, July 31 (AFP) - Britain's top policeman has promised that an inquiry he is leading into the death of Princess Diana will be the final word on the issue, and should put an end to the myriad conspiracy theories linked to her demise.

In an interview with the Sunday Telegraph newspaper, John Stevens said that everyone connected with Diana's death would have to accept that the as-yet uncompleted investigation would end the matter.

The inquiry was ordered in January by Britain's royal coroner Michael Burgess. "We will do everything in our power to ensure that, once and for all, the whole aspect of this particular episode has been investigated as thoroughly as possible," Stevens said.

"I shall be giving evidence to the coroner's court, as will some of the officers who are working with me. Then I think people will then have to say, one way or the other, that that's the end of the matter."

Stevens, who is about to retire as the head of London's Metropolitan Police force, has 10 British detectives working for him full time.

The probe was launched to answer those who have queried whether Diana's death on August 31, 1997 when the car she was travelling in crashed in a Paris underpass, was an accident.

An official French report into the incident concluded that the cause had been a drunken chauffeur who was driving too fast and was not qualified to be behind the wheel of the powerful armoured limousine.

However Egyptian tycoon Mohamed Al Fayed, whose son Dodi also died in the crash, has insisted the death was the work of intelligence services worried about the princess's relationship with his son.

Stevens said he would pay particular attention to interviews with staff from Britain's internal and external security services, MI5 and MI6, who Al Fayed has accused of being complicit in Diana's death.

"The allegations regarding MI5 and MI6 I will be dealing with myself," Stevens told the paper.

However he warned that the inquiry's conclusion might be delayed by Al Fayed's attempts to query the official French investigation.

"The French appeal court has found in certain aspects in Mr Fayed's favour and has asked the French authorities and the examining magistrate to look at some other aspects of the inquiry," Stevens said.

"So we will be very much dictated by where the French authorities are in terms of their inquiry."

In April, the police officer visited the underpass where Diana died, having earlier been to the Ritz Hotel where Diana and Dodi began their last journey, before retracing their 1.5 mile (2.5 kilometres) route.

© AFP

 

Subject: French news

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