Brigitte Bardot turns 70, shrugs off wrinkles

28th September 2004, Comments 0 comments

PARIS, Sept 28 (AFP) - Brigitte Bardot, the screen siren of the 60s, makes no bones about turning 70 on Tuesday: it's a milestone worthy of celebrating but no great shakes next to her celebrated youth.

PARIS, Sept 28 (AFP) - Brigitte Bardot, the screen siren of the 60s, makes no bones about turning 70 on Tuesday: it's a milestone worthy of celebrating but no great shakes next to her celebrated youth.  

"Thank God for allowing me to make it this far. But, all the same, I would prefer turning 30," she told this week's French society magazine Ohla!  

The former French actress has seen her rebellious beauty that once floored audiences - and co-stars - fade and be replaced by a reputation as an outspoken campaigner for animal rights and against Islam, immigration and homosexuality.  

Most recently, she has made news for being fined EUR 5,000 (USD 6,000) in June for making racist comments against Muslims in a book, "Un Cri Dans le Silence" (A Cry in the Silence).  

"Our ancestors, our grandfathers, our fathers gave their lives over the centuries to push successive invaders out of France," she wrote in the book, complaining that "today, they (Muslims) have the last word".  

In Ohla!, Bardot, who has lived in the chic French Riviera village of Saint-Tropez since turning her back on cinema three decades ago after making more than 50 films, said she would mark her birthday discreetly and without regret.  

"I am going to drink a glass of champagne, receive two or three friends," she said.  

"I'm fine with the passage of time. There is a crazy wind blowing today: women want to stay young and are turning to surgery. They all look the same.... Perfection is a terrible worry."  

Bardot, who once filled gossip pages with her string of lovers and husbands, today lives as a semi-recluse with her third spouse, Bernard d'Ormale.  

She has one son from her previous marriage to former actor/producer Jacques Charrier.  

In France, she still enjoys iconic status, though that has been greatly mitigated by her recent hard-right stands. The lingering touch of fame is not to her taste, however.  

"When I'm recognised, I should feel pleasure, but it gets my back up," she said.  

"If I played a role in changing French society, its attitude, it was in spite of myself.... I think I represented a change, a wish of society at a given moment."

 

© AFP

 

Subject: French News

0 Comments To This Article