American Indians demand namechange at sexy Paris cabaret

18th October 2004, Comments 0 comments

PARIS, Oct 16 (AFP) - A group of Native American Sioux Indians called on Saturday for a Paris cabaret club named after the Sioux warrior Crazy Horse to change its name out of respect for the legendary 19th-century figure.

PARIS, Oct 16 (AFP) - A group of Native American Sioux Indians called on Saturday for a Paris cabaret club named after the Sioux warrior Crazy Horse to change its name out of respect for the legendary 19th-century figure.

A member of the Sioux Oglala tribe, in Paris for a festival celebrating American cultures, on Saturday delivered a letter to the Crazy Horse cabaret signed by Harvey White Woman, a descendent of the warrior's uncle, Little Hawk.

"My family are offended whenever there is a show of disrespect to our culture and especially to our honourable leaders," wrote the author, who claims to be acting in the name of the Oglala Sioux community.

"Whenever the name Crazy Horse is mentioned, it brings out the man who led our people during the 1800s and who fought bravely against the United States military so his people will live in the traditions and culture that we see today," her petition stressed.

She explained that the letter was prompted by the discovery that stage shows at the Crazy Horse featured pseudo-Indian feathered headdresses - on mostly naked dancers - which she saw as an insult to the memory of the Sioux
warrior.

"I want the young people of my tribe to remember him as a strong leader and warrior and not some nightclub in Paris," she added.

Alfred Red Cloud, a 53-year-old Oglala Sioux from South Dakota - of the same age as the cabaret on Paris' exclusive Avenue George V - told AFP he felt charged with a "mission", as he hand-delivered the message to the club.

"I'm not trying to close the establishment down, you know, it's the name, just change the name, that's all we want," he said.

"If I don't get a response, I'll be back and (...) maybe bring some more chiefs and maybe go through the legal channels," he added.

Crazy Horse, or Tashunka Witko, was born in South Dakota in around 1842 and became a near-mythical figure since his death in 1877.

The warrior spearheaded resistance to US military campaigns to drive his people out of the mineral-rich Black Hills and onto reservations, until he was finally arrested by US forces and stabbed to death during an escape attempt.

© AFP

Subject: French News

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