Zapatero support slumps as Spaniards fear immigration

18th November 2005, Comments 0 comments

18 November 2005, MADRID — Spaniards are increasingly concerned about rising immigration while support for the government has fallen dramatically, a poll finds.

18 November 2005

MADRID — Spaniards are increasingly concerned about rising immigration while support for the government has fallen dramatically, a poll finds.

Immigration is the number two worry for Spaniards, after unemployment, according to poll results released by a respected social-research institute.

In poll after poll, immigration has been rising in importance as an issue for Spaniards.

The survey, by the Centre for Sociological Investigation, also found the Socialist government's popularity had slipped to within two points of the conservative opposition Popular Party (PP).

Prime minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero's party garnered the supoort of 39.7 percent of those questioned, while the  PP got 37.7 percent.

Some 37 percent of respondents now spontaneously list immigration as a concern, compared to 51 percent citing unemployment and 25 percent identifying terrorism, which has lost more than 20 percentage points in recent months.

The category of other economic issues took fourth place in the survey for October, with 22 percent. Housing was cited as a concern by 20 percent of respondents.

The poll was conducted between 21-28 October, just weeks after the incidents in Spain's North African enclaves of Ceuta and Melilla, where sub-Saharan Africans made numerous attempts to enter the Spanish cities illegally, rushing the border fence.

Several immigrants died, hundreds were deported and a new border fence was constructed by Spanish authorities.

Regarding the economy, those questioned were split between those saying it was "bad" or "very bad" (21.7 percent) and those responding that it was doing "good" or "very good" (23 percent).

One-third of Spaniards, however, said they expected the economy to worsen in the next 12 months, compared to 12 percent who said it would improve.

[Copyright EFE with Expatica]

Subject: Spanish news

 

0 Comments To This Article