Victims of Madrid massacre demand justice two years on

15th February 2006, Comments 0 comments

15 February 2006, VALENCIA — Victims of the Madrid bombings demanded answers from the Spanish government about all the unknown, unresolved elements still surrounding the massacre that killed 191 people.

15 February 2006

VALENCIA — Victims of the Madrid bombings demanded answers from the Spanish government about all the unknown, unresolved elements still surrounding the massacre that killed 191 people.

They requested decisive action from Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero's administration so they can get on with their lives.

Speakers at a 3rd International Congress of Terror Victims roundtable dealing with the 11 March attacks asked the courts to hurry up with the court case so they could at least have some "moral compensation".

"Who ordered the attacks? What role did the government play? And why are there no reports on the investigations?" were some of the questions posed by one of the victims, Gabriel Moris.

Moris believes the silence that has prevailed up to now is not a valid response.

"Current procedures have not cleared up the facts because there is no political will to find out the truth," he said.

The president of the Association for Aiding 11 March Victims, Maria Angeles Dominguez, said that according to research commissioned by her group, some 90 percent of those affected are "unsatisfied" with the investigation as it has been carried out up to the moment.

She therefore called on the government for "decisive action" so that the victims and their families "can get on with their lives" and obtain "the peace and tranquillity that justice brings".

Laura Jimenez, who was paralyzed in the attack and lost the baby she was expecting, said she could not understand "how something like that could happen without anybody suspecting it".

She said that it will be impossible to prevent other attacks if no answer is given "to all questions that have never been answered".

The president of the Association of the Victims of 11 March, Pilar Manjon, paid homage to the victims, offering glimpses into some of their lives, talking about their plans and recalling their last moments before boarding trains on their way to being blown up in Madrid.

Islamic extremists were behind the 11 March, 2004, commuter train bombings in Madrid that killed nearly 200 people and wounded some 1,500 others, the worst terrorist attack in Spain's history.

Spanish police have arrested scores of suspected Islamic militants after the 9/11 attacks on the United States, and intensified its anti-terrorist efforts after the Madrid bombings.

At present 40 suspects are expected to stand trial later this year.

[Copyright EFE with Expatica]

Subject: Spanish news

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