The chef reinventing "toltilla"

7th November 2007, Comments 0 comments

7 November 2007, MADRID - David Muñoz, a veteran of London's Nobu, is bringing a heady mix of cuisines to his new restaurant in the capital

7 November 2007

MADRID - David Muñoz, a veteran of London's Nobu, is bringing a heady mix of cuisines to his new restaurant in the capital

It smells like herbs and spices in David Muñoz's kitchen. The aroma is enticing and prompts patrons to wonder what this 27-year-old chef has in store for them at DiverXo, his new Asian-Spanish fusion restaurant in Madrid. Diners who manage to get a reservation for one of the eight tables there will discover tastes that they will never forget.

Muñoz, who has worked for top restaurants such as Viridiana in Madrid or Nobu and Hakkasan in London, knew at age 16 that his future lay in food.

"When I realized that cooking was my thing, I didn't stop buying books to try to discover the magic inside food," he says.

His goal was to open his own place, somewhere where he could offer diners a sampling of all the things he learned in the European and Asian restaurants where he learned his trade. That dream came true this spring, when DiverXo opened in the decidedly unsophisticated neighborhood of Tetuán (Francisco Medrano, 5) after he put his own home up as collateral.

There is a lot of risk and imagination behind the dishes at DiverXo - things such as <i>Spanish toltilla</i>, a poached potato and onion dim sum with quail's egg and an emulsion of peppers and red beans. Other dishes on the menu include Mediterranean shrimp fried with yuzu and warm mayonnaise, black cod browned in cider and Chinese honey, and roasted skate with Kenya beans and special XO sauce.

"I make an effort to combine the techniques I have learnt as brilliantly as possible in order to take my crazy schemes to the extreme," says Muñoz. "Being in places such as Hakkasan was like a dream. I spent hours watching the cook in charge of dim sum. They wouldn't let me near him. When I was done at the restaurant, I would stay at home practicing what I'd seen and trying with great difficulty to do what came so easily to him."

"There are still a lot of dishes missing because I am very demanding and everything I offer has to be very carefully prepared," he says, explaining that the secret of his cuisine lies in the combination of flavors.

"I enjoy trying to show the customers something different. My intention is to experiment and see if there are limits or not. My menu doesn't change very much because the effort that goes into it is tremendous. Making a restaurant work, no matter how small, is unbelievably hard. But once everything is going smoothly I will add more dishes."

[Copyright EL PAÍS, SL./ Amaya Iribar 2007]

Subject: Spanish news

 


 

7 November 2007

MADRID - David Muñoz, a veteran of London's Nobu, is bringing a heady mix of cuisines to his new restaurant in the capital

It smells like herbs and spices in David Muñoz's kitchen. The aroma is enticing and prompts patrons to wonder what this 27-year-old chef has in store for them at DiverXo, his new Asian-Spanish fusion restaurant in Madrid. Diners who manage to get a reservation for one of the eight tables there will discover tastes that they will never forget.

Muñoz, who has worked for top restaurants such as Viridiana in Madrid or Nobu and Hakkasan in London, knew at age 16 that his future lay in food.

"When I realized that cooking was my thing, I didn't stop buying books to try to discover the magic inside food," he says.

His goal was to open his own place, somewhere where he could offer diners a sampling of all the things he learned in the European and Asian restaurants where he learned his trade. That dream came true this spring, when DiverXo opened in the decidedly unsophisticated neighborhood of Tetuán (Francisco Medrano, 5) after he put his own home up as collateral.

There is a lot of risk and imagination behind the dishes at DiverXo - things such as <i>Spanish toltilla</i>, a poached potato and onion dim sum with quail's egg and an emulsion of peppers and red beans. Other dishes on the menu include Mediterranean shrimp fried with yuzu and warm mayonnaise, black cod browned in cider and Chinese honey, and roasted skate with Kenya beans and special XO sauce.

"I make an effort to combine the techniques I have learnt as brilliantly as possible in order to take my crazy schemes to the extreme," says Muñoz. "Being in places such as Hakkasan was like a dream. I spent hours watching the cook in charge of dim sum. They wouldn't let me near him. When I was done at the restaurant, I would stay at home practicing what I'd seen and trying with great difficulty to do what came so easily to him."

"There are still a lot of dishes missing because I am very demanding and everything I offer has to be very carefully prepared," he says, explaining that the secret of his cuisine lies in the combination of flavors.

"I enjoy trying to show the customers something different. My intention is to experiment and see if there are limits or not. My menu doesn't change very much because the effort that goes into it is tremendous. Making a restaurant work, no matter how small, is unbelievably hard. But once everything is going smoothly I will add more dishes."

[Copyright EL PAÍS, SL./ Amaya Iribar 2007]

Subject: Spanish news

 


 

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