Teen jailed for six years for Madrid massacre role

15th November 2004, Comments 0 comments

16 November 2004, MADRID- The Spanish supreme court sentenced a teenager implicated in the March 11 Madrid train bombings to six years in youth detention after he pleaded guilty to handling explosives used in Spain's worst terrorist attack on the opening day of his trial.

16 November 2004

MADRID- The Spanish supreme court sentenced a teenager implicated in the March 11 Madrid train bombings to six years in youth detention after he pleaded guilty to handling explosives used in Spain's worst terrorist attack on the opening day of his trial.

The prosecution had originally called for an eight-year term in youth detention for the 16-year-old, who stood accused of transporting from northern Spain to the capital the explosives used in the attacks which left 191 people dead and almost 2,000 more injured.

Just prior to the trial of the youth, who appeared in court hidden by a screen, prosecutor Blanca Rodriguez lowered her initial demand to six years and his guilty plea saw proceedings completed within minutes.

The youngster, nicknamed El Gitanillo (the little gypsy), became caught up in the 11 March blasts as the accomplice of a former miner who turned to drug trafficking.

The adolescent admitted in court that he had helped transport explosives used in the coordinated bombing of four commuter trains at three Madrid train stations.

Radical Muslims affiliated with the Al-Qaeda terror network claimed responsibility for the attacks, which the conservative Spanish government at the time initially blamed on Basque separatists.

Media were present at the trial but were not allowed either to publish the youth's name or take pictures.

Rodriguez said she was satisfied that the original eight-year term called for had been reduced as under that scenario the youth "would have had to be transferred to a penitentiary for adults."

That would not have benefited his eventual reinsertion into society on
release, she added.


The teenager was detained on 16 June on the same day as a former miner, who used him to carry explosives by bus from Asturias in northern Spain to Madrid, where he met up with radical Islamists who were plotting the attack.

In return, prosecutors allege, they provided drugs.

According to judicial sources, the 16-year-old was paid around EUR 1,000 (USD 1,300) for his help which he admitted to investigators in pre-trial interviews.

The youth is one of 19 suspects held on suspicion of involvement in the attacks. The majority are Moroccan nationals.

Warrants have been issued for six fugitive suspects while seven others blew themselves up in a police raid on a flat in a southern suburb of Madrid on 3 April.

Examining magistrate Juan del Olmo, who in all has identified 32 suspects believed connected with the blasts, is hoping to complete work on his dossier before the first anniversary of the bombings.

A parliamentary commission of inquiry into the bombings has over the past four months heard testimony from a slew of investigators as well as leading politicians.

Later this month, former Spanish prime minister Jose Maria Aznar, who initially insisted that the bombings were the work of Basque separatist group ETA even as evidence emerged fingering Islamic fanatics, is also due to give testimony.

Aznar's Popular Party (PP) lost a general election three days after the bombings which prior to the carnage it had been forecast to win easily.

[Copyright EFE with Expatica]

Subject: Spanish news

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