Suspected mad cow disease a false alarm

5th June 2006, Comments 0 comments

5 June 2006, MADRID - An autopsy has ruled out a suspected Spanish case of mad cow disease alleged to have been contracted in the UK.

5 June 2006

MADRID - An autopsy has ruled out a suspected Spanish case of mad cow disease alleged to have been contracted in the UK.

Madrid's department of public health said Javier Monge had died of the original form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob, not the new form which developed in the UK, which is contracted from contaminated animal products.

"The results of the autopsy are negative, according to the tests carried out in the reference centre of the Fundacion Hospital Alcorcon", health officials told the news agency EFE.

Monge's parents had requested the tests, insisting that their son had died of the human form of mad cow disease. Monge spent more than a year in the UK at the end of the 90s and had to be hospitalised in May 2000 in Hospital 12 in Madrid when he started to suffer neurological problems.

The department of health said the autopsy results would be sent to Edinburgh so that experts could pinpoint what genetic form of the disease killed Monge, who died on 27 April.

Whereas the new form of BSE – known as mad cow disease - has been linked to contaminated animals, the classic forms of Creutzfeldt are believed to occur only sporadically in patients who inherit an abnormal protein called prion.

Both forms of the disease have similar symptoms.

Monge's mother, Rosa Sanz, criticised the autopsy verdict, describing it as "the last blow" to the family.

[Copyright EFE with Expatica]

Subject: Spanish news

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