'Spanish' prostitutes rebuild city in Brazil

1st March 2005, Comments 0 comments

1 March 2005, RIO DE JANEIRO- The south-central Brazilian city of Uruacu, whose fragile economy depended on the manufacturing and sale of rosaries and other religious items until just a few years ago, owes much of its prosperity today to remittances from local women working as prostitutes in Spain.

1 March 2005

RIO DE JANEIRO- The south-central Brazilian city of Uruacu, whose fragile economy depended on the manufacturing and sale of rosaries and other religious items until just a few years ago, owes much of its prosperity today to remittances from local women working as prostitutes in Spain.

The "Spanish women," as they are lovingly called by the city's 33,000 residents, own a third of the commercial property in Uruacu, are the best customers of local beauty salons and clothing shops, and live in the most elegant neighbourhood in the city, located some 190 kilometres (118 miles) northwest of Brasilia, the weekly Veja reported.

In light of the economic growth sparked by investment of remittances in Uruacu, the women have made prostitution a subject for public discussion, since many parents know what their daughters do for a living and many children understand why their mothers are absent for extended periods of time.

The bottom line is clear, according to the magazine, which noted that a craftswoman in the city can earn 150 reais (about USD 58) for a day's work making religious objects, or less than half what a fellow townswoman can make for 20 minutes of "work" in Spain.

Catia Sirley Moreira, 23, is one of many young women who have prospered by going to Spain in search of a living.

A mechanic's daughter, Catia earned enough in five years of working at a nightclub in Asturias, in northern Spain, to start two auto rickshaw companies, buy a house and two lots, to start up a clothing store in Uruacu.

Alzino Aquino, a devout Catholic, said he understood the reason his two daughters went to Palma de Mallorca seven years ago to try their luck.

Since then, with the remittances sent by the young women, Aquino has overseen the construction of four houses, one of them with a pool.

"I never liked the idea, but they couldn't find any jobs here," Aquino said.

Even the city's language schools are offering special Spanish classes to young women who want to travel to Spain and join their mothers.

[Copyright EFE with Expatica]

Subject: Spanish news

0 Comments To This Article