Spanish party drops immigrant bombing video game

17th November 2010, Comments 0 comments

Spain's main opposition Popular Party said Wednesday it had removed a video game posted on its website that depicted the president of its branch in Catalonia bombing illegal immigrants and Catalan separatists.

The game called "rescue", which also had an iPhone version, was pulled from the site late on Tuesday, just hours after it was launched as part of the party's campaign for regional elections in Catalonia on November 28.

In it Alicia Sanchez Camacho is depicted flying on the back of a large white seagull named Pepe with points awarded when the bird bombs aircraft parachuting illegal immigrants, an independence movement blimp or a mouth representing the imposition of the Catalan language.

She is renamed Alicia Croft in the game, a play on the name of the heroine of the popular "Tomb Raider" video game series, Lara Croft.

In a statement, the conservative Popular Party said the manufacturer of the video game had not followed its instructions properly.

Instead of firing against illegal immigrants, the seagull should have fired against the organised crime groups that traffic them, it said.

Popular Party spokesman Esteban Gonzalez Pon said the "realisation" of the video game "had not been as good as the original idea".

"It was a mistake. The idea was to have Sanchez Camacho confront Catalonia's problems, which are unemployment, the independentist fever at the situation of many people without work, and the mafias that brought them here and keep them here," he told reporters.

During the election campaign Sanchez Camacho has proposed that legal immigrants return to their country of origin if they are unemployed and foreigners sign an "integration contract" vowing to learn the local language and customs.

The latest poll by the CIS polling institute shows the centre-right Catalan nationalist party (CiU) is ahead with 24.4 percent support while the ruling Catalan Socialist Party has 14.2 percent. The Popular Party has 6.2 percent.

© 2010 AFP

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