Spaniards blame Iraq invasion for bombings

7th March 2005, Comments 0 comments

7 March 2005, MADRID - More than two-thirds of Spaniards are convinced their government's support for the Iraq war was one of the reasons for the Madrid train bombings that killed 191 people a year ago, according to a poll. The survey found that 69.1 percent of the 1,000 people interviewed blamed Spain's involvement in Iraq for triggering the 11 March attacks on commuter trains, while 20.4 percent disagreed.

7 March 2005

MADRID - More than two-thirds of Spaniards are convinced their government's support for the Iraq war was one of the reasons for the Madrid train bombings that killed 191 people a year ago, according to a poll.
 
The survey found that 69.1 percent of the 1,000 people interviewed blamed Spain's involvement in Iraq for triggering the 11 March attacks on commuter trains, while 20.4 percent disagreed.

The poll, released  by radio Cadena Ser and conducted by the Opina institute on 23 February, has a 3.1 percent margin of error.

The vast majority of Spaniards were opposed to sending a Spanish military contingent to Iraq as part of the US-led invasion.

Former Spanish Prime Minister Jose Maria Aznar, who was in power at the time of last year's attacks, was a supporter of US President George W Bush's policy in Iraq.

Aznar's party was defeated in the 14 March elections right after the attacks.

The Socialists under the leadership of Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero came to power and withdrew the Spanish forces from Iraq, fulfilling a campaign promise.

Nearly a year later, 63.9 percent of those polled said they still feel vulnerable to a new strike by Islamist militants with 12.8 percent claiming to feel "very vulnerable," according to the poll conducted by the Opinion Institute.

A group linked to the global Al-Qaeda network has claimed responsibility for the Madrid bombings, the worst extremist attack ever in Spain.

The survey also showed that 54.8 percent think that it is clear Islamic militants were responsible for the Madrid attacks while 31.7 percent do not.

Another 29 percent still think there is a connection with the Basque separatist group ETA, which was initially accused of masterminding the attacks by the Aznar government.

[Copyright EFE with Expatica]

Subject: Spanish news

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