Spain's water reserves dip to 40pc for first time

27th September 2005, Comments 0 comments

27 September 2005, MADRID — Spain's water reserves have fallen below 40 percent of their normal level for the first time as the country continues to struggle with the worst drought for nearly 60 years.

27 September 2005

MADRID — Spain's water reserves have fallen below 40 percent of their normal level for the first time as the country continues to struggle with the worst drought for nearly 60 years.

Even though domestic water supplies are still not being affected, some areas of the country are now on maximum alert this week.

Among those areas is the capital, where residents have been warned they may face water stoppages.

The environment ministry said there was 21,238 cubic hectares of water in the reserves – or 0.5 percent less than the week before.

At the same point in 2004, reserves were at 57 percent of their normal level.

Rain has been very scarce throughout the country, despite some heavy showers in Catalonia.

The worst situation is in the River Segura basin in south-east Spain, where reserves have reached just ten percent of their normal levels.

In the River Júcar basin they stood at 18.4 percent and the lakes of Catalonia were down to just 27.6 percent  of normal capacity.

In other parts, the River Sur basin stood at 29.9 percent of capacity, the Tajo at 33.4 percent, the Duero at 38 percent and the Ebro at 39.5 percent

The worst situation was in the areas with the highest population like the Madrid region, where authorities declared maximum or level one alert this week.

On Friday, the government is due to decide if they are to go ahead with a new diversion of water from the River Tajo to the River Segura, which feeds much of the agricultural areas in south-eastern Spain, where a lot of tomatoes and other vegetables are grown for foreign export.

Spain is experiencing the worst drought since 1947.

[Copyright EFE with Expatica]

Subject: Spanish news

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