Spain draws up map of sunken treasure

5th September 2007, Comments 0 comments

5 September 2007, CEUTA - The government of this Spanish enclave in North Africa forecasts that this month work will begin on making an underwater map identifying sunken ships along the coast south of the Strait of Gibraltar to prevent their potential plundering.

5 September 2007

CEUTA - The government of this Spanish enclave in North Africa forecasts that this month work will begin on making an underwater map identifying sunken ships along the coast south of the Strait of Gibraltar to prevent their potential plundering.

The task of creating the map has been handed to the Spanish firm Nerea Arqueologia Submarina, which will have a budget of 45,000 euros ($61,200) and will begin working on the project in the coming days.

The study will allow authorities to locate the remains of sunken ships in the area to make entities charged with protecting them aware of the country's patrimony lying on the ocean bed along the coast.

The aim is to bear witness to the location of archaeological remains after they have been definitively pinpointed by archaeologists, says the firm.

The strait is being investigated by archaeologists and firms specializing in finding underwater treasure, since over the centuries many ships have gone down with their cargoes - including shipments of gold, silver and other precious items - in the area.

The map is intended to be used as an instrument to protect Spain's underwater patrimony.

Madrid is currently pursuing a lawsuit in U.S. federal court to assert ownership of treasure recovered in May by Odyssey Marine Exploration of Tampa, Florida.

On May 18, Odyssey Marine announced its recovery of gold and silver coins valued at 373 million euros ($500 million), treasure that Spain's Culture Ministry said was "taken from a Spanish-flagged (wreck)" in international waters. EFE

[Copyright EFE with Expatica]

Subject: Spanish news

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