Sands of time reveal Megatooth monster

13th May 2005, Comments 0 comments

13 May 2005, MADRID — Spanish archaeologists have discovered what they believe is evidence of a beach dating back millions of years near the southern city of Antequera.

13 May 2005

MADRID — Spanish archaeologists have discovered what they believe is evidence of a beach dating back millions of years near the southern city of Antequera.

Officials from Granada University's Prehistory and Archaeology department and archaeologists revealed they had found a range of "relatively well preserved" fossils dating from the Tortonian era, part of the Miocene period, the fourth of five epochs in the Tertiary period.

The beach is now some several hundred metres inland.

According to their estimations that would make the fossils at least seven million but possibly more than nine million years old.

A spokesman for the Prehistory Department of Madrid's National University of Distance Learning said it was too early to comment in detail on the find "but it sounds as if it could be of some significance".
 
Among the fossil elements found are some which appear to come from the Carcharodon Megalodon, otherwise known as the giant Megatooth shark, thought to be related to the great white shark, which is believed to have been some 20 metres in length.
 
The Megatooth is widely assumed to have died out hundreds of thousands of
years ago.

Several fossils of the creature, most notably its gigantic teeth, have surfaced in Europe and also in South Carolina in the United States.

Citing potential "exceptional interest" in them as a tourist attraction geologists hope to win support from the regional government of Andalusia to have the fossils put on show.

Other fossils discovered at the site include assorted sea urchins, starfish, snails and corals.

[Copyright EFE with Expatica]

Subject: Spanish news

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