Parliament gets say on foreign military invention

16th September 2005, Comments 0 comments

16 September 2005, MADRID — The Spanish Parliament approved a new defence law that requires the approval of the lower house for any military intervention abroad.

16 September 2005

MADRID — The Spanish Parliament approved a new defence law that requires the approval of the lower house for any military intervention abroad.

Defense minister Jose Bono said the law would allow legislators to block military actions decided solely by the executive branch, as was the case with Iraq, whose invasion was supported by the conservative government that preceded the incumbent Socialist one.

The leftist government, which took office in April 2004, pulled Spanish troops out of Iraq.

With the new legislation, parliament "will never be a silent witness" to the deployment of troops abroad, Bono said, adding that from now on Spain would be guided by U.N. resolutions, European Union agreements and unanimous NATO decisions.

Spanish troops participated in the Iraq operation from June 2003 to April 2004, when the new prime minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero pulled them out to fulfil a election campaign promise.

But the conservative Popular Party (PP), Spain's main opposition party, claimed the new legislation violated the consensus established in defence policy over the past 25 years and it would change the law once it regained power.

The new legislation also addresses the role of the armed forces in the fight against terrorism, reorganizes the branches and improves pay for military personnel.

[Copyright EFE with Expatica]

Subject: Spanish news

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