Opposition demands bombing inquiry goes on

21st December 2004, Comments 0 comments

21 December 2004, MADRID-The opposition conservative Popular Party has demanded the parliamentary commission into the Madrid bombings should continue despite widespread criticism of the inquiry.

21 December 2004

MADRID-The opposition conservative Popular Party has demanded the parliamentary commission into the Madrid bombings should continue despite widespread criticism of the inquiry.

The move came as politicians were preparing to decide on Wednesday if the commission should carry on or close.

All other parties want the inquiry to conclude its hearings this week, except the Popular Party.

Angel Acebes, PP general secretary, has asked for ten more people to give evidence and for the commission to continue "until we finish-up the investigation".

They want to hear from more police chiefs in Asturias, where the explosives used in the bombings were stolen apparently despite police knowing there was a trade in stolen explosives.

The PP also want to hear from a police officer who disclosed a tape recorded conversation in which in appeared police knew about this trade in 2001 – three years before the bombings in which 191 people died.

They are also asking for a secret report on relations between ETA and Islamic radicals in prison to be disclosed to the commission.

The PP has always claimed there is a link between the two terrorist factions, though this has been strongly denied by police, security forces and the Socialist government.

The commission has come under widespread criticism for being dominated by party political bickering.

One of the relatives of a victim of Spain's worst terrorist atrocity last week delivered a withering attack on the parliamentary inquiry.

During an emotional appearance, Pilar Manjon said politicians had tried to profit from the Madrid bombings by playing "school-yard" politics in the inquiry.

After her testimony, Spanish prime minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero announced a separate body would be set-up to examine how victims of terrorism are treated.

Manjon said after her appearance, she was personally contacted by the Kind of Spain Juan Carlos and Zapatero.

She said: "I felt most, though not all, politicians, were listening without their party-political glasses on."

The parliamentary commission, which is investigating the events surrounding the bombings in which 191 people died and more than 1,500 people were injured, has been criticised before for being bogged-down in party-political squabbling.

Manjon, whose own 21-year-old son was killed in the attacks, gave a televised account to the commission, saying she wanted to bring the "voice of the absent" to the hearing.

[Copyright EFE with Expatica]

Subject: Spanish news

 

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