One death every two hours on Spain's roads

8th December 2003, Comments 0 comments

8 December 2003, VALENCIA - Three men died in a head-on collision Monday as shocking figures revealed the extent of fatal accidents on Spanish roads.

8 December 2003

VALENCIA - Three men died in a head-on collision Monday as shocking figures revealed the extent of fatal accidents on Spanish roads.

One person is killed every two hours, according to figures released by the Spanish Traffic Department.

In the past ten years, 57,166 people have died on the roads — or the same number as the population of the province of Segovia. In 2002 alone, 5,347 were killed in traffic accidents.

The figures came as traffic police in Valencia reported that three men were killed and another five injured in the early hours of Monday.

The four-car collision happened at about 3.15am on the N332 between Valencia and Cartagena near a village called Sollana.

Two cars crashed head-on and two more smashed into the back of these cars.

The victims were the two drivers of the cars, two men aged 30 and 21, and a 22-year-old male passenger.

Four people who were in the same cars also suffered serious injuries, including a four-year-old child.

They were two women, aged 19 and 29, and a 23-year-old man.

Another young boy, who was a passenger in a third car, was also injured.

One of the drivers of a car which smashed into the back of another car, escaped with slight injurues. The driver of the fourth car was not found at the scene of the crash when ambulancemen arrived.

Young people were the highest risk group on the roads, according Francisco Bonet, of the Catalonia Autombile Club. Twenty-three per cent of those killed in 2002, were aged below 30.

Also, 58 percent of drivers aged between 18 and 24 had been involved in some form of accident.

Snr Bonet said deaths on the roads were an "epidemic of our century", even more serious than Aids.

In a survey of the areas of Spain with the most dangerous stretches of roads, Galicia came top, followed by Asturias and Aragon. In fifth place, was the region of Valencia. Bottom of the table was Madrid.

The cause of most accidents were alcohol or speeding. This year, 37 percent of those drivers killed on the roads had been drinking more than the legal limit — three grammes of alcohol per litre of blood.

[Copyright EFE with Expatica]

Subject: Spanish news

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