Offences up but Spain has lowest crime in Europe

13th February 2007, Comments 0 comments

13 February 2007, MADRID — Crime rose by just 0.2 percent last year, giving Spain the lowest rate of criminality in the European Union.

13 February 2007

MADRID — Crime rose by just 0.2 percent last year, giving Spain the lowest rate of criminality in the European Union.

The interior minister Alfredo Rubalcaba said on Tuesday crime went up by 0.2 percent overral.

He said this was due to a slow decrease in the number of crimes combined with a slight increase in the number of recorded offences.

Armed robberies went down 1.6 percent while robberies in which violence against the person fell by 4.3 percent.

But the major rise was seen in cases of domestic violence which went up 8.4 percent.

Rubalcaba said this could be due to the fact that more women were making complaints about abusive partners.

In 2006, 68 women were killed by their partners or ex-partners.

Crime rates across Europe have dropped sharply over the past decade, according to a survey of 40,000 Europeans asked about their experiences of falling victim to offences ranging from car theft to sexual assault.

Fifteen percent of those interviewed said they had been victim of a common crime in 2004, down from 21 per cent in 1995 when crime across the continent peaked, according to a telephone survey coordinated by research group Gallup.

Ireland and Britain came out on top of the crime scale, with just over 20 per cent of interviewees saying they had recently fallen victim to at least one crime, compared to around 10 per cent in Spain and Hungary and an EU average of 15 per cent.

[Copyright EFE with Expatica]

Subject: Spanish news

 

0 Comments To This Article