Most tourists come to Spain by low-cost flights

20th July 2005, Comments 0 comments

20 July 2005, MADRID — Record numbers of tourists have come to Spain in the past six months, according to the latest figures.

20 July 2005

MADRID — Record numbers of tourists have come to Spain in the past six months, according to the latest figures.

Twenty-four million visitors spent their holidays in Spain — a rise of 5.7 percent compared with the same period in 2004.

However, though more people came to Spain, they were staying a shorter time and spending less money, according to figures from the Bank of Spain.

In April, income from tourism fell 7.2 percent compared with the same month in 2004.

The month before, the amount tourists spent fell still further, by 9.3 percent compared with 12 months before.

Low-cost airlines are the principal route for tourists to come to Spain.

Importantly, for Spain, tourism was helping less and less to equal out the balance of payments, because visitors to the country were spending less.

Tourists might be spending less because of economic downturns at home, rather than being put off dipping into their pockets while in Spain.

Catalonia, in north-east Spain, remained the favourite destinations, according to the industry ministry.

So almost a quarter of tourists coming to Spain went to this region — a 13.2 percent rise from the year before.

The largest number of visitors were British and Germany.

The second most popular destination, the Canary Islands, gets 20 percent of visitors.

This was not compensated by the rise in the number of Germans and tourists from Nordic countries. Indeed there was a fall of 2.4 percent overall, year-on-year.

But in the Balearic Islands, Andalusia, Valencia and Madrid, the number of tourists rose by seven percent.

The British were the largest group of visitors to Spain, with 7.2m arriving between January and June  - a rise of 2.1 percent. This was followed by Germans (4.5m, 4.6pc more)

The French were the third largest group, with 3.4m or 13.3 percent more in the past six months, compared with 2004.

[Copyright EFE with Expatica]

Subject: Spanish news

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