More police on streets to tackle gang violence

29th September 2005, Comments 0 comments

29 September 2005, MADRID — The Spanish government has announced it will put more specially trained police officers on the street to combat the violence carried out by gangs of youths.

29 September 2005

MADRID — The Spanish government has announced it will put more specially trained police officers on the street to combat the violence carried out by gangs of youths.

Interior minister Jose Antonio Alonso said that youth gangs, including Latin American gangs, are a problem all over Spain, although they are particularly prevalent in Madrid and Barcelona.

He said that the phenomenon is a "very serious" concern for his ministry and that the government will increase the police presence in the areas where the gangs are concentrated.

Alonso said that in Madrid, where gang violence has increased considerably, the number of police officers specially trained to handle such problems will be doubled in October.

He added that there are two specific police groups investigating crimes committed by the gangs.

In addition, he said that the problem is not one that can be fought solely by the police, but rather it is a social problem for which special response groups must be created and teaching activities made more effective.

He referred to a report presented on Tuesday by the Madrid government which included data about the criminal activities of juvenile gangs in the capital.

The document analyzes several violent groups in the capital area: neo-Nazis, Latin American gangs, so-called "anti-system" gangs comprising anarchists and others, and vandals, including graffiti artists.

It has been the Latin American youth gangs that have committed the most serious crimes, including murders, but the neo-Nazis are the ones who have committed the most reported crimes of all kinds, which the report says number 91.

The most numerous and important Latin American gangs in the capital are the Latin Kings, with more than 350 identified members, and the Ñetas, with some 250 members.

The study says gang members are the children of "unstructured" families, whose parents often left them with relatives in their countries of origin when they came to Spain to work.

And even though they eventually were able to bring the children to be with them, the parents have not been able to give them the attention they need because of long working hours.

[Copyright EFE with Expatica]

Subject: Spanish news

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